ERA10CA288
ERA10CA288

According to the private pilot, she contacted the operator of the private airport several days before the accident to obtain permission to land. The operator informed the pilot that the runway was a 2,800-foot turf runway and briefed her on the hazards associated with runway 15 and 33. He recommended the pilot make her approach to runway 15 due to a 15-foot drop off into a stream at the end of runway 33. The pilot and her husband, who was a passenger, departed on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. Once they were cleared to a lower altitude by an air traffic controller and had a visual sighting of the airport, the pilot cancelled the IFR flight plan and proceeded on a visual approach straight in to runway 15. She reduced all power and extended the flaps to 40 degrees. Her approach was fast and high and she made a go-around when the airplane was half way down the runway. She climbed out on runway heading, made a 180-degree turn, checked the winds at a local airport 3 miles away on her global positioning system, and initiated a straight in full flap approach to runway 33. Her husband reported power lines and she increased power to clear the lines. The airplane touched down on the last third of the runway and she immediately applied heavy brakes. She realized she would be unable to stop and applied full power. The airplane went off the drop off into the stream. The pilot stated she did not experience any mechanical problems with the airplane. A Federal Aviation Administration inspector examined the runway and stated he observed tracks up to but no further than 250 to 300 feet before the runway edge of the creek.

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