FTW02LA066
FTW02LA066

On January 10, 2002, at 1057 mountain standard time, a Piper PA-46T single-engine airplane, N87WW, was substantially damaged when it collided with the runway while landing at the Double Eagle II Airport (AEG) near Albuquerque, New Mexico. The airplane was registered to Polzien, Inc., of Ardmore, Oklahoma, and operated by the pilot. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The cross-country flight originated from Ardmore, Oklahoma, approximately 0830.

The pilot reported to an FAA inspector that he was executing the instrument landing system (ILS) approach to runway 22 and had disconnected the autopilot. The pilot further reported that approximately 100 feet agl, the airplane descended from the clouds and was aligned right of the runway. The pilot attempted to align the airplane with the runway by banking left and then right. As the airplane banked right, the right wing struck the runway. Subsequently, the airplane impacted the runway, exited the runway to the south, and slid about 1,500 feet before coming to a stop upright.

In the submitted Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident Report (NTSB Form 6120.1/2), the pilot stated that he "landed on runway 22 and left landing wheel broke causing other two wheels to fold."

The pilot reported that he was not sure if the approach lights and runway lights were operating; however, the airport manager reported that the pilot controlled runway lights were illuminated when he arrived at the accident site after the accident.

A witness observed "a white shadow descend out of the clouds." She then observed the airplane bank "sharply" to the left and back to the right. The airplane then contacted the runway with the right wing and skidded off the left side of the runway.

Examination of the airplane by the FAA inspector, who responded to the accident site, revealed that the right wing, approximately 4 feet outboard from the fuselage was split open, and the spar was damaged. The propeller and landing gear sustained damage.

The pilot reported that he checked the automated weather observing system (AWOS) "three times shortly before landing," and that "VFR [was] indicated." The pilot further reported that at the time of the accident, snow was falling heavily, light turbulence was present, and the sky was obscured. In the section of the 6120.1/2 entitled Recommendation (How Could This Accident Have Been Prevented), the pilot wrote "accurate weather report at destination."

At 1025, the AWOS for AEG reported the wind from 140 degrees at 13 knots, broken cloud layer at 1200 feet, overcast cloud layer at 1,600 feet, temperature 2 degree Celsius, dew point 0 degrees Celsius, and the altimeter was 30.20 inches of mercury.

At 1105, the AWOS for AEG reported the wind from 130 degrees at 12 knots, temperature 1 degree Celsius, dew point 0 degrees Celsius, and the altimeter was 30.21 inches of mercury. The cloud height and visibility were not reported.

At 1145, the AWOS for AEG reported the wind from 140 degrees at 15 knots, broken cloud layer at 200 feet, overcast cloud layer at 1,000 feet, temperature 1 degree Celsius, dew point 1 degrees Celsius, and the altimeter was 30.21 inches of mercury.

At 1001, the automated surface observing system (ASOS) at Albuquerque International Airport (ABQ), located 11 nautical miles east-southeast of AEG, reported the wind from 100 degrees at 18 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, broken cloud layer at 2,900 feet, temperature 5 degree Celsius, dew point -3 degrees Celsius, and the altimeter was 30.20 inches of mercury.

At 1102, the ASOS at ABQ reported the wind from 090 degrees at 17 knots, visibility 3 statute miles with light snow, overcast cloud layer at 1,300 feet, temperature 3 degree Celsius, dew point -1 degrees Celsius, and the altimeter was 30.20 inches of mercury.

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