ANC00LA031
ANC00LA031

On March 5, 2000, about 1620 Alaska standard time, a ski-equipped Cessna 170B airplane, N2814C, sustained substantial damage during takeoff from a remote, snow-covered area, about 20 miles west of Big Lake, Alaska, about latitude 61 degrees, 34 minutes north, and longitude 150 degrees, 29 minutes west. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross-country personal flight to Anchorage, Alaska, when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by the pilot. The private certificated pilot, and the two passengers, were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on March 6, 2000, the pilot reported he was taking off toward the east. During the takeoff run, the pilot said he noticed sloping terrain in front of the airplane that angled sharply to the left. To avoid the drop off, he applied right rudder, and turned about 10 degrees to the right. He then applied left rudder to stop the turn, but the left ski dug into soft snow. The airplane ground looped to the left, and then nosed down in the snow. The airplane received damage to the landing gear, both wings, and the left horizontal stabilizer. The pilot said the wind conditions were calm.

Use your browsers 'back' function to return to synopsis
Return to Query Page