MIA96FA033
MIA96FA033

HISTORY OF THE FLIGHT

On December 2, 1995, about 1755 eastern standard time, a Cessna 150M, N63298, registered to Triad Aviation, Inc., collided with the ground when control was lost at the Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport, Burlington, North Carolina, while on a 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The aircraft was destroyed and the commercial-rated pilot was fatally injured. The flight originated from Burlington, the same day about 1715.

Witnesses stated the flight departed the airport on runway 24 and entered the traffic pattern. The pilot then performed a low pass down runway 24 and pulled up into about a 50-degree nose-up attitude. The pilot leveled off and again made another low pass and steep pull-up. The pilot then departed the pattern and was observed away from the airport at about 3,500 feet performing spins and wing over maneuvers. The flight returned to the airport and made two more low passes down runway 24 and pulled up into a steep climb. After the fourth pull-up an employee at the airport asked the pilot how high he got. He responded 1,100 feet msl or 500 feet agl. The pilot then returned for another pass down runway 24. After the low pass the pilot nosed the aircraft up to about a 70-degree attitude. The aircraft stalled and entered a spin to the left. After 1 3/4 turns the aircraft impacted the ground nose first, next to runway 24.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Information on the pilot is contained in First Pilot Information.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

Information on the aircraft is contained in Aircraft Information.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. Additional meteorological information is contained in Weather Information.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The aircraft crashed to the north of runway 24, near the intersection of runway 24 and runway 28, at the Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport. The aircraft impacted the ground in a nose down, near vertical descent, at a slow airspeed. All components of the aircraft necessary for flight were located on or around the main wreckage. Continuity of all flight control cables was established.

Examination of the aircraft showed the nose and wing leading edges were crushed aft. The right wing leading edge was also bent downward and the left wing leading edge was bent upward. The wing flaps were retracted and the elevator trim was set for trim tab 6 degrees up or nose down.

The propeller and crankshaft propeller flange separated from the engine during impact and was located at the initial point of impact. The propeller had bending damage consistent with rotation at the time of ground impact. Examination of the engine showed the engine rotated and compression was developed by each cylinder. Continuity of the valve train, crankshaft, camshaft, and accessory drive gears was established. The spark plugs had a color consistent with normal engine operation. Each magneto fired properly when rotated by hand. Aviation fuel was found in the carburetor and fuel lines. All carburetor passages were open and the float and shutoff valve operated normally.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Post-mortem examination of the pilot was performed by John D. Butts, M. D., Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt traumatic injuries. No findings which could be considered causal to the accident were reported.

Post-mortem toxicology testing on specimens obtained from the pilot was performed by Dr. Butts. The tests were negative for ethanol alcohol, carbon monoxide, basic, acidic, and neutral drugs.

For additional medical and pathological information see Supplement K and the toxicology report.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The aircraft wreckage was released to Gary L. Herman on December 3, 1995.

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