SEA95LA045
SEA95LA045

On February 5, 1995, about 1710 mountain standard time, N9CR, a Cessna 185, operated by the owner/pilot, impacted terrain during an uncontrolled descent immediately after takeoff and was substantially damaged in McCall, Idaho. The private pilot and his three passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed. The personal flight was conducted under 14 CFR 91. The flight departed from McCall and was destined for Wilbur, Washington.

The pilot stated that he "took off ... as a group of three" airplanes from runway 16 at the McCall Airport behind two other Cessna 185 airplanes. He stated that the "takeoff was normal, breaking ground in about 1000 [feet of runway length]. The pilot further stated that the airplane began to climb "between 85 [and] 90" miles per hour (mph) and reached an altitude of about 65 feet when the right wing and nose dropped "violently." The airplane "turned 90 degrees to the right" and the pilot "used full left rudder and aileron and up elevator to counteract the forces on the aircraft." The pilot also stated that he "hit wake turbulence" during the takeoff. No preimpact mechanical deficiencies were reported by the pilot

According to ground witnesses, all three airplanes taxied onto runway 16 at the same time. The lead airplane took off first. The second and third airplanes then began their takeoff rolls and lifted off from the ground at the same time. The third airplane (accident airplane) immediately commenced a right bank after liftoff, and then descended into terrain. One of the witnesses stated that the accident airplane "... didn't have enough speed and wasn't off the ground enough before starting to turn."

According to an FAA aviation safety inspector from Boise, Idaho, the airplane impacted snow-covered terrain about 1,200 feet south and 200 feet west of the departure end of runway 16. The landing gear was separated, an aileron was bent, and the underside of the fuselage was damaged. No pre-impact mechanical malfunctions were found.

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