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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-97-102
Details
Synopsis: ON 11/19/96, AT 1701 CENTRAL STANDARD TIME, UNITED EXPRESS FLIGHT 5925, A BEECHCRAFT 1900C, N87GL, COLLIDED WITH A BEECHCRAFT KING AIR A90, N1127D, AT QUINCY MUNICIPAL AIRPORT, NEAR QUINCY, ILLINOIS. FLIGHT 5925 WAS COMPLETING ITS LANDING ROLL ON RUNWAY 13, AND THE KING AIR WAS IN ITS TAKEOFF ROLL ON RUNWAY 04. A THIRD AIRPLANE, A PIPER CHEROKEE, WAS POSITIONED FOR PLANNED TAKEOFF ON RUNWAY 04 BEHIND THE KING AIR. THE COLLISION OCCURRED AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE TWO RUNWAYS. ALL 10 PASSENGERS AND TWO CREWMEMBERS ABOARD FLIGHT 5925 AND THE TWO OCCUPANTS ABOARD THE KING AIR WERE KILLED. FLIGHT 5925 WAS A SCHEDULED PASSENGER FLIGHT OPERATING UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF TITLE 14 CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS (CFR) PARAT 135. THE FLIGHT WAS OPERATED BY GREAT LAKES AVIATION, LTD., DOING BUSINESS AS UNITED EXPRESS. THE KING AIR WAS OPERATING UNDER 14 CFR PART 91.
Recommendation: THE NTSB RECOMMENDS THAT THE FAA: REITERATE TO FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS THE IMPORTANCE OF EMPHASIZING CAREFUL SCANNING TECHNIQUES DURING PILOT TRAINING AND BIENNIAL FLIGHT REVIEWS.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Closed - Acceptable Action
Mode: Aviation
Location: QUINCY, IL, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: DCA97MA009AB
Accident Reports: Runway Collision United Express Flight 5925 and Beechcraft King Air A90 Quincy Municipal Airport
Report #: AAR-97-04
Accident Date: 11/19/1996
Issue Date: 9/12/1997
Date Closed: 12/1/1998
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Closed - Acceptable Action)
Keyword(s): General Aviation, Training and Education

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 12/1/1998
Response: The FAA stated that it continually emphasizes the importance of scanning techniques during pilot training, biennial flight reviews, flight instructor refresher clinics, designated pilot examiner standardization courses, and other venues. Because the FAA's action meets the intent of Safety Recommendation A-97-102, it is classified "Closed--Acceptable Action."

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 11/24/1997
Response: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) continually emphasizes the importance of scanning techniques during pilot training and biennial flight reviews. Scanning techniques are emphasized during flight instructor refresher clinics and designated pilot examiner standardization courses. Additionally, the FAA's Practical Test Standards for all airman certification levels outline, in clear and concise language, the responsibility of both the flight instructor and examiner to emphasize specific performance in effective visual scanning techniques and collision avoidance procedures. These Practical Test Standards set the standards for minimum acceptable skill levels of knowledge and competence to which an applicant must perform in both flight training for an airman certificate and for an airman certification practical test. Collision avoidance is a required instructional core subject under Advisory Circular (AC) 61-83D, Nationally Scheduled FAA-Approved Industry-Conducted Flight Instructor Refresher Clinics. The AC provides guidance for the preparation and approval of industry-conducted flight instructor refresher clinics. Flight instructor refresher clinic sponsors regularly include broad aspects of collision avoidance and scanning techniques in their training course outlines. In addition, AC 90-48C, Pilots' Role In Collision Avoidance, outlines detailed ways in which improvements in operating practices, procedures, and improved scanning techniques will help to avoid traffic conflicts on the ground and in the air. The FAA frequently publishes articles related to this issue in its bimonthly FAA Aviation News magazine related to this issue. Some examples of articles that have been published are "Situational Awareness," "Collision Avoidance," "Land and Hold Short," and "Making Yourself Known at Uncontrolled Airports." The FAA also published two articles and a video on runway incursions, which are readily available to the public and address issues of scanning techniques. The November/December issue of FAA Aviation News will also contain an article on runway incursions. I believe that the efforts taken by the FAA completely address this safety recommendation, and I consider the FAA's action to be completed.