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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-97-062
Details
Synopsis: On 5/11/96, about 1415 eastern daylight time, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9-32 crashed into the everglades swamp shortly after takeoff from Miami International Airport, Miami Florida, the airplane, N904VJ, was operated by ValuJet Airlines, Inc., as ValuJet flight 592. Both pilots, the three flight attendants, and all 105 passengers were killed. Before the accident, the flightcrew reported to air traffic control that it was experiencing smoke in the cabin and cockpit. Visual meteorological conditions existed in the Miami area at the time of the takeoff. The destination of the flight was Hartsfield International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia. Flight 592 was on an instrument flight rules flight plan.
Recommendation: TO THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION: Evaluate and support appropriate research, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration research program, to develop technologies and methods for enhancing passenger respiratory protection from toxic atmospheres that result from in-flight and post-crash fires involving transport-category airplanes.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Closed - Acceptable Action
Mode: Aviation
Location: Miami, FL, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: DCA96MA054
Accident Reports: In-Flight Fire and Impact With Terrain Valujet Airlines Flight 592 DC-9-32, N904VJ
Report #: AAR-97-06
Accident Date: 5/11/1996
Issue Date: 9/9/1997
Date Closed: 7/23/1999
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Closed - Acceptable Action)
Keyword(s):

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 7/23/1999
Response: THE FAA RESPONDED THAT IT HAS EVALUATED AND SUPPORTED RESEARCH IN METHODS OF ENHANCING PASSENGER RESPIRATORY PROTECTION IN TRANSPORT-CATEGORY AIRPLANES. THE FAA PLANS CONTINUED SUPPORT AND EVALUATION OF RESEARCH IN THIS AREA WITH NASA AND INDUSTRY. BECAUSE THE FAA'S ACTIONS MEET THE INTENT OF A-97-62, IT IS CLASSIFIED "CLOSED--ACCEPTABLE ACTION."

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 11/17/1997
Response: The FAA has for several years evaluated and supported research in methods of enhancing passenger respiratory protection in transport-category airplanes. After the 1983 Air Canada DC-9 accident in Cincinnati, the FAA participated in extensive international studies, which resulted in the development of a joint international standard entitled "Minimum Operational Performance Specification for Passenger Protective Breathing Equipment." In conducting the safety benefits study after the Air Canada accident of the effect of passenger protective breathing devices, it was determined that the potential safety detriments (delays in evacuation) may outweigh the possible benefits of smoke protection. The FAA will continue to support and evaluate research in this area with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and industry. However, I consider the FAA's action completed in response to this safety recommendation.