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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-88-060
Details
Synopsis: ON AUGUST 3, 1986, AT 12:35 P.M., A BELL 206B HELICOPTER, N49606, OWNED AND OPERATED BY JOE FOSTER EXCAVATING, INC., DANVILLE, CALIFORNIA, CRASHED IN A WOODED AREA IN ALAMO, CALIFORNIA, WHILE CIRCLING A RESIDENCE. VISUAL METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS PREVAILED AT THE TIME. THE PILOT AND PASSENGER, THE OWNER OF THE HELICOPTER, SUSTAINED FATAL INJURIES; THE HELICOPTER WAS DESTROYED.
Recommendation: THE NTSB RECOMMENDS THAT THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION: INSTITUTE PROCEDURES AND ASSOCIATED RECORDKEEPING TO SHOW THAT THE FEDERAL AIR SURGEON OR A MEDICAL CONSULTANT(S), AT LEAST ONE OF WHOM IS RECOGNIZED AND CERTIFIED IN THE MEDICAL DISCIPLINE UNDER CONSIDERATION, REVIEW ALL TREATING PHYSICIAN(S) DIAGNOSIS BEFORE ISSUING A MEDICAL CERTIFICATE UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF TITLE 14 CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS 67.19.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Closed - Unacceptable Action
Mode: Aviation
Location: ALAMO, CA, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: LAX86MA311
Accident Reports: Joe Foster Excavating, Inc., Bell 206B, N49606
Report #: AAR-88-04
Accident Date: 8/3/1986
Issue Date: 6/6/1988
Date Closed: 1/4/1990
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Closed - Unacceptable Action)
Keyword(s):

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 1/4/1990
Response: By letter dated May 22, 1989, we classified the FAA's earlier response to these safety recommendations as "Open--Unacceptable Action" and provided further justification for their adoption. Since the FAA does not agree with these safety recommendations, and is of the view that its current policies and procedures are satisfactory, both Safety Recommendations A-88-59 and -60 are now classified as "Closed--Unacceptable Action."

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 11/3/1989
Response: The FAA has reviewed its position and does not agree with this safety recommendation. The FAA currently reviews all medical information made available by airmen under consideration for special issuance of a medical certificate. The FAA has access to medical specialists in disciplines appropriate to the airman certification process and does not hesitate to have such specialists review the medical information when consultation is considered necessary for a determination of eligibility for certification. The FAA believes that its current procedures to obtain medical information selectively for review by appropriate staff and consultants provide the documentation required to determine eligibility for special issuance of medical certification. The FAA believes that the current process is satisfactory and does not consider it necessary to limit the certification process specifically as recommended in this safety recommendation.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 5/22/1989
Response: With regard to Safety Recommendation A-88-60, the Safety Board believes that all pertinent medical information should be made available to the FAS and that, most importantly, the FAS should have access to the airman's treating physician's diagnosis. In the August 3, 1986, accident at Alamo, California, the FAS did not have the pilot's treating physician's diagnosis. We are of the opinion that the FAS may have decided differently had these records been available. We note that the treating physician was a Board certified cardiologist. While the FAA has the final authority to grant a special issuance certificate, the Safety Board believes that the FAS should have the advice of a medical consultant recognized and certified in the medical discipline under consideration. This is not to be construed that the medical consultant be given the authority to grant or deny the special issuance certificate. The Safety Board believes that unless these recommended procedures are instituted, a situation similar to that at Alamo, California, could recur. We request your reconsideration of the above recommendations which will be held in an "Open-- Unacceptable Action" status pending further response.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 8/26/1988
Response: THE FAA DOES NOT AGREE WITH THIS RECOMMENDATION. THE FAA'S PHYSICIANS, SOME CERTIFIED IN AEROSPACE MEDICINE, HAVE YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN MEDICAL CERTIFICATION FOR AVIATION ACTIVITIES. THE FAA HAS IMMEDIATE ACCESS TO CERTIFIED CARDIOLOGISTS, AS WELL AS SPECIALISTS IN OTHER MEDICAL FIELDS, FOR CONSULTATION OR FOR REFERRAL OF CASES. THE FAA DOES NOT AGREE THAT THE RECORDS OF EVERY PAST TREATING PHYSICIAN BE OBTAINED AND REVIEWED BY A SPECIALIST IN THE PERTINENT MEDICAL FIELD. THE FAA BELIEVES THAT ITS CURRENT PRACTICE OF SELECTIVE RECORD COLLECTION AND REVIEW BY APPROPRIATE STAFF AND CONSULTANTS PROVIDES FOR ADEQUATE DOCUMENTATION AND REVIEW OF THE INFORMATION NEEDED TO DETERMINE THE ELIGIBILITY FOR MEDICAL CERTIFICATION. THE FAA BELIEVES THAT THE CURRENT PROCESS IS SATISFACTORY AND DOES NOT CONSIDER IT NECESSARY TO LIMIT THE CERTIFICATION PROCESS SPECIFICALLY AS RECOMMENDED IN THIS RECOMMENDATION.