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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-83-026
Details
Synopsis: ON JULY 9, 1982, PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS FLIGHT 759 CRASHED AFTER TAKING OFF FROM RUNWAY 10 AT NEW ORLEANS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, KENNER, LOUISIANA. WHEN FLIGHT 759 TOOK OFF, THERE WERE ISOLATED HEAVY SHOWERS OVER THE AIRPORT AND TO THE EAST OF THE AIRPORT ALONG THE AIRPLANE'S INTENDED DEPARTURE PATH. LOW LEVEL WIND SHEAR CONDITIONS HAD BEEN DETECTED BY THE AIRPORT'S LOW LEVEL WIND SHEAR ALERT SYSTEM (LLWSAS), AND THE SYSTEM HAD ALARMED SEVERAL TIMES, THE LAST TIME ABOUT 4 MINUTES BEFORE FLIGHT 759'S TAKEOFF. THE SYSTEM WAS NOT ALARMING AT THE TIME THE TAKEOFF CLEARANCE WAS ISSUED; HOWEVER, A WIND SHEAR ADVISORY WAS BROADCAST 2 SECONDS AFTER THE ACCIDENT.
Recommendation: THE NTSB RECOMMENDS THAT THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION: ADVISE AIR CARRIERS TO INCREASE THE EMPHASIS IN THEIR TRAINING PROGRAMS ON THE EFFECTIVE USE OF ALL AVAILABLE SOURCES OF WEATHER INFORMATION, SUCH AS PREFLIGHT METEOROLOGICAL BRIEFINGS, ATIS BROADCASTS, CONTROLLER-PROVIDED INFORMATION, PIREPS, AIRBORNE WEATHER RADAR, AND VISUAL OBSERVATIONS, AND PROVIDE ADDED GUIDANCE TO PILOTS REGARDING OPERATIONAL (I.E., "GO/NO GO") DECISIONS INVOLVING TAKEOFF AND LANDING OPERATIONS WHICH COULD EXPOSE A FLIGHT TO WEATHER CONDITIONS WHICH COULD BE HAZARDOUS.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Closed - Acceptable Action
Mode: Aviation
Location: Kenner, LA, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: DCA82AA028
Accident Reports: Pan American World Airways, Inc., Clipper 759, Boeing 727-235, N4737
Report #: AAR-83-02
Accident Date: 7/9/1982
Issue Date: 3/25/1983
Date Closed: 10/1/1985
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Closed - Acceptable Action)
Keyword(s): Flightcrew, Training and Education, Weather

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 10/1/1985
Response: The Safety Board staff, who viewed the film "Probable Cause," which has been distributed extensively throughout the aviation community, were most impressed with its presentation of the wind shear problem. We also are satisfied with the FAA's efforts to educate the air carriers, controllers, meteorologists and pilots with regard to the hazards of wind shear. This recommendation is classified "Closed-- Acceptable Action." We thank you for the actions taken and ongoing with regard to these recommendations.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 4/2/1985
Response: FAA LTRA: THE FAA 'S MOST RECENT FILM, "PROBABLE CAUSE," HAS BEEN DISTRIBUTED AT THE BROADEST POSSIBLE LEVEL. THE FILM HAS GONE TO AIR CARRIERS, TO ACCIDENT PREVENTION SPECIALISTS FOR PUBLIC SHOWINGS, TO AVIATION INTEREST GROUPS (I.E., AIR TRANSPORT ASSOCIATION, AIR LINE PILOTS ASSOCIATION, AIRCRAFT OWNERS AND PILOTS ASSOCIATION, ETC.), AND THE INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION'S FILM LIBRARY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION IN THREE DIFFERENT LANGUAGES.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 5/29/1984
Response: The development and wide distribution of a film on wind shear which includes JAWS data, and the fact that the FAA plans to continue to provide emphasis on disseminating new information and technology in the area of meteorology to the aviation community are responsive to this recommendation. Pending the general distribution of the wind shear film by the FAA, Safety Recommendation A-83-26 will be maintained in an "Open--Acceptable Action" status. While this is being held as open--acceptable action, we wish to express concern that many pilots do not make full use of available weather information. We will observe further responses to this recommendation in light of what we have asked in A-83-18. Your continued cooperation in solving aviation safety problems is appreciated.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 7/21/1983
Response: FAA LETTER: THE FAA HAS PUBLISHED NUMEROUS DOCUMENTS TO EDUCATE, INFORM, AND, IN SOME CASES, DIRECT A COURSE OF ACTION FOR DEALING WITH WEATHER INFORMATION. THE AIR CARRIERS ARE REQUIRED BY FEDERAL AVIATION REGULATIONS (FAR) TO PROVIDE SUFFICIENT METEOROLOGICAL TRAINING TO ENSURE A PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE OF WEATHER PHENOMENA. THE PRINCIPLE OPERATIONS INSPECTORS (POI) ARE REQUIRED TO REVIEW AND APPROVE THE AIR CARRIER PROGRAM WHICH MUST INCLUDE METEOROLOGICAL TRAINING. AIRCRAFT DISPATCHERS ARE REQUIRED TO BE THOROUGHLY FAMILIAR WITH REPORTED AND FORECAST WEATHER CONDITIONS, AND THIS INFORMATION MUST BE COMMUNICATED TO THE PILOT-IN-COMMAND BOTH PRIOR TO THE DEPARTURE AND IN FLIGHT. IN ALL CASES, THE PILOT-IN-COMMAND MUST BE FAMILIAR WITH WEATHER CONDITIONS FOR THE FLIGHT. THE FAA WILL, HOWEVER, CONTINUE TO PROVIDE EMPHASIS TO NEW INFORMATION AND TECHNO LOGY IN THIS AREA AS IT BECOMES AVAILABLE. AN EXAMPLE IS THE RESULTS OF THE JAWS PROJECT. A NEW FILM ON WIND SHEAR, PLUS SOME OF THE INFORMATION GAINED ON THE JAWS PROJECT, IS BEING DEVELOPED. THE FILM WILL BE PROVIDED WIDE DISTRIBUTION THROUGHOUT THE INDUSTRY. BEYOND THIS FILM, THERE ARE NO SIGNIFICANT EFFORTS PLANNED WITH REGARD TO THIS RECOMMENDATION.