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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-79-063
Details
Synopsis: DURING THE SAFETY BOARD'S INVESTIGATION OF THE UNITED AIR LINES DC-8 ACCIDENT AT PORTLAND, OREGON, ON DECEMBER 28, 1978, SEVERAL PROBLEMS WERE DISCOVERED WHICH AFFECTED ADVERSELY THE SURVIVABILITY OF THE AIRCRAFT OCCUPANTS. THE BOARD BELIEVES THAT THESE PROBLEMS ARE NOT LIMITED TO THIS PARTICULAR AIR CARRIER OR TO THIS PARTICULAR AIRCRAFT; THUS THEY MAY AFFECT PERSONS INVOLVED IN FUTURE ACCIDENTS.
Recommendation: TO THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION: Expedite research with a view toward early rulemaking on a means to most effectively restrain infants and small children during in-flight upsets and survivable crash landings. (Superseded by A-83-1)
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Closed - Superseded
Mode: Aviation
Location: Portland, OR, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: DCA79AA005
Accident Reports: United Airlines, Inc., McDonnell- Douglas, DC-8-61, N8082U
Report #: AAR-79-07
Accident Date: 12/28/1978
Issue Date: 8/10/1979
Date Closed: 2/24/1983
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Closed - Superseded)
Keyword(s): Child Restraint Systems

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 8/4/1998
Response: Notation 7019: The National Transportation Safety Board has reviewed your Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM), "Child Restraint Systems," which was published in 63 FR 8323 on February 18, 1998. The ANPRM requests comments on crash performance and ease-of-use information about existing and new automotive child restraint systems (CRS), when used in aircraft, as well as the development of any other new or improved CRS designed exclusively for aircraft use. The ANPRM also seeks information about the technical practicality and cost feasibility of requiring small children and infants to be restrained in CRS in aircraft. The ANPRM is in response to the February 12, 1997, report to President Clinton by the White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security. The report stated, "The [Federal Aviation Administration] FAA should revise its regulations to require that all occupants be restrained during takeoff: landing, and turbulent conditions, and that all infants and small children below the weight of40 pounds and under the height of 40 inches be restrained in an appropriate child restraint system, such as child safety seats, appropriate to their height and weight." In 1979, the Safety Board issued its first safety recommendation regarding CRS aboard aircraft. At that time, the Board recommended that the FAA expedite research with a view toward early rulemaking on a means to most effectively restrain infants and small children during in-flight upsets and survivable crash landings (A-79-63). Since then the Safety Board has issued five additional recommendations on this subject. In 1983, the Safety Board recommended that the FAA accept CRS approved by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) until the FAA and the NHTSA developed CRS standards acceptable for both automotive and aircraft use (A-83-1). In 1990, the Safety Board recommended that the FAA require that all aircraft occupants be restrained (A-90-78) and that the FAA conduct research to determine at what age/size children can be properly restrained by aircraft lap belts (A-90-79). Safety Recommendation A-90-78 was classified "Closed-Unacceptable/Superseded" on May 26, 1995, and A-90-79 was classified "Closed-Acceptable Action" on May 15, 1995. In its April 4, 1995, accident report on the crash of a DC-9 in Charlotte, North Carolina, the Safety Board noted its disappointment with the FAA's actions regarding the required use of CRS on air carrier flights. The report noted the probable introduction of ISOFIX (standard CRS attachments that will be incorporated into the design of automobiles) and expressed Safety Board concerns about possible future problems for parents who might not have the appropriate CRS for aircraft use. Accordingly, the Safety Board issued a recommendation asking the FAA to develop standards for forward-facing, integrated CRS for use in aircraft (A-95-50). Safety Recommendation A-95-50 was classified "Open-Acceptable Response" on July 26, 1996. The Safety Board continues to believe that all occupants, including young children should be restrained. Not requiring restraint use for infants and children Jess than 2 years old is inconsistent with recent policy by several airlines that seated occupants should be restrained at all times during a flight to ensure their safety. The Safety Board also continues to believe that the FAA should develop standards for integrated CRS for aircraft. The Safety Board is aware that the NHTSA has issued a proposed revision to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 213 to consider a method of securing CRS in automobiles. This change would require motor vehicles to have a dedicated anchorage system for CRS separate from the seatbelt system. These changes would make it impossible to use a CRS with an airline Jap belt and further reinforce the need to develop standards for integrated CRS for aircraft. The Safety Board appreciates the opportunity to comment on this ANPRM.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 8/16/1982
Response: As you know, the Safety Board has initiated a study to review the subject TSO. Recommendation A-79-63 will remain in an open--acceptable action status until completion of this review. At that time we will notify you of the disposition of the recommendation's status. In the mean-time, we look forward to continued cooperation between our agencies on this importanct issue. PER GREEN SHEET A-83-1 DATED 2/24/83 Recommendation A-79-63 has been placed in a Closed Superseded with A-83-1.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 6/4/1982
Response: FAA LTR: ON MAY 28, 1982, TSO-C100, CHILD RESTRAINT SYSTEMS WAS ISSUED.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 4/6/1981
Response: We note that the FAA has published a draft TSO-C100 which prescribes the minimum performance standard that child restraint systems must meet. Pending the final issue of the TSO, A-79-63 will be maintained in an open--acceptable action status.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 12/30/1980
Response: FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION LTR: FAA CONCURS IN EXPEDITING RESEARCH ON A MEANS TO MOST EFFECTIVELY RESTRAIN INFANTS AND SMALL CHILDREN DURING INFLIGHT UPSETS AND SURVIVABLE CRASH LANDINGS, AND REPORTS ISSUANCE ON OCTOBER 2, 1980, OF A TSO PRESCRIBING THE MINIMUM PERFORMANCE STANDARD THAT CHILD RESTRAINT SYSTEMS MUST MEET.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 7/9/1980
Response: The FAA's response of November 23, 1979, indicated actions underway to resolve these recommendations. In order to evaluate their progress and update the public docket, we would appreciate an updated status report.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 1/4/1980
Response: The Safety Board appreciates the ongoing efforts of the FAA to satisfy the intent of these recommendations. In the meantime, they will be classified in an open--acceptable action status.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 11/23/1979
Response: FAA LTR: AN FAA TASK FORCE WAS ESTABLISHED EARLY IN 1979 TO DEVELOP THE OPTIONS AVAILABLE REGARDING AGENCY ACTIONS NEEDED TO PERMIT THE MANUFACTURE AND USE OF EFFECTIVE AIRCRAFT CHILD RESTRAINT SYSTEMS. THE PROPOSED STANDARDS COVERING CHILD RESTRAINT SYSTEMS ARE SCHEDULED FOR ISSUANCE EARLY IN 1980.