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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-74-013
Details
Synopsis: ON JULY 23, 1973, AN OZARK AIRLINES FAIRCHILD HILLER FH-227B WAS INVOLVED IN AN ACCIDENT AT ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI. THE NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD'S INVESTIGATION OF THE ACCIDENT REVEALEDTHREE SAFETY ITEMS WHICH WARRANT CORRECTIVE ACTION.
Recommendation: DEVELOP AND INSTALL TERMINAL AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL RADAR CAPABLE OF LOCATING SEVERE WEATHER AND DISPLAYING CONVECTIVE TURBULENCE. THIS RADAR SHOULD BE USED TO VECTOR AIRCRAFT AROUND SEVERE WEATHER.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Closed - Acceptable Action
Mode: Aviation
Location: St. Louis, MO, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: DCA74AZ003
Accident Reports: Ozark Air Lines, Inc., Fairchild Hiller FH-227B, N4215
Report #: AAR-74-05
Accident Date: 7/23/1973
Issue Date: 4/18/1974
Date Closed: 7/18/1990
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Closed - Acceptable Action)
Keyword(s): Air Traffic Control, Turbulence, Weather

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 6/18/1990
Response: (per greensheet A-90-83 thru -85). The TDWR and ASR-9 programs satisfy the intent of this recommendation. The FAA contracted for delivery of 47 TDWR systems, with implementation of operational units scheduled to being in 1993. About 9 ASR-9s are currently in operation at airports throughtout the United States. The FAA, however, plans to commission an additional 104 systems over the next several years. (Recommendation A-74-13, issued April 18, 1974, is reclassified as "closed-- acceptable action.")

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 12/12/1988
Response: The FAA has taken numerous actions to meet the intent of this safety recommendation. There are four major programs that are currently underway that address the safety recommendations. These major programs are the terminal NEXRAD, terminal doppler weather radar (TDWR), ASR-9, and the advanced automation system (AAS) program. The terminal NEXRAD will provide doppler weather radar coverage for 16 major airports. These radars will be replaced when the first 45 TDWR's are deployed. The TDWR is designed to provide complete weather protection for the airport. The capability to advise directly the cockpit crew of adverse weather in the airport area is inherent in the TDWR design and will be implemented through use of the Mode S data link. The ASR-9 weather channel will make 2 levels of weather data available on the controllers display. A total of 110 radars will be deployed. The AAS is the next generation air traffic control system. A primary subsystem, the sector suite, will provide a fully integrated display of traffic, weather, and aeronautical information.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 5/15/1987
Response: Safety Board staff became aware of the experimental program being conducted at the FAA's Kansas City ARTCC. This program involved the presentation of FAA or new weather radar information on the atc planned (PVD). On June 5, 1986, Safety Board investigators received a briefing, of this new radar capability. Safety Board investigators were advised that, if this experimental program is adopted and implemented on a national basis, the broad band radar would be terminated. Unfortunately, a planned field evaluation of this system was not conducted, and to the best of our knowledge no further efforts to test or adopt the system are under consideration by the FAA. The Safety Board believes a system similar to that which was operated at the Kansas City ARTCC should be given full consideration by the FAA. The Safety Board will follow the progress of NEXRAD and the ASR-9.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 1/30/1987
Response: In 1988, 16 doppler weather radars originally intended for NEXRAD program will be adapted for terminal operations and deployed to high density terminals. These systems will be used at these locations until they are replaced by terminal doppler weather radar systems designed specifically for terminal operations.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 9/16/1986
Response: The Safety Board has carefully reviewed the integrated wind shear program plan and the two letters from the FAA and finds that the actions concurrently being taken and planned by the faa will comply with the intent of this recommendation.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 5/5/1986
Response: The recommended weather products and enhancements will be available when the advanced automation system sector suite is implemented. The integrated weather radar/air traffic control radar single video display will be attained with the introduction of the 9020 host computer replacement, and will include doppler weather radar and central weather processor. I anticipate that the advanced automation system sector suite and the 9020 host computer replacement program will be completed by mid 1990. As noted in previous responses, the FAA concurs with the intent of these recommendations and is steadily working toward completion of this project. The FAA has incorporated the various systems and subsystems referenced in these recommendations into programs which will be introduced into FAA facilities. I request that, based on the FAA's ongoing efforts and the timeframe associated with the completion of this project, these recommendations be classified as closed-- acceptable action. I consider the FAA's action to be completed on these recommendations.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 3/8/1983
Response: We concur that doppler radar technology holds the most promise for the detection and display of severe weather, wind shear, and turbulence in the terminal environment. However, in light of the Pan American accident in Kenner, Louisiana, on 9/9/82, and the near accident involving a TWA aircraft at La Guardia Airport, New York, on July 28, 1982, we urge the FAA to expedite the implementation of this technology. When the technology is in place, the FAA should consider using this information to provide vectors to aircraft. Pending completion of this program we will maintain the recommendation as open--acceptable action.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 10/13/1982
Response: FAA LETTER: A FIRM PROGRAM FOR THE DESIGN AND TESTING OF A DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR THAT WILL DETECT AND DISPLAY TURBULENCE AND WIND SHEAR IN BOTH THE EN ROUTE AND TERMINAL ENVIRONMENTS IS ABOUT 50 PERCENT COMPLETE. THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE, THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE (NWS), AND THE FAA HAVE ESTABLISHED A JOINT UNIT TO DETERMINE WHAT AND HOW THE DOPPLER RADAR WILL BE PROCURED. THIS SYSTEM IS THE ONLY SYSTEM THAT CAN SATISFY RECOMMENDATION A-74-13. THE FAA IS FORMALIZING ITS REQUIREMENTS.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 8/9/1982
Response: We are presently conducting a special investigation titled Flight Into Severe Storms. As part of our investigation and for the public docket record, we would appreciate receiving an updated status report.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 6/10/1977
Response: FAA LETTER: THE SYSTEMS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SERVICE HAS DESIGNED A MODIFICATION THAT WILL BE INSTALLED AND TESTED ON THE NEW ORLEANS TERMINAL RADAR SYSTEM IN JULY AND AUGUST 1977. THE TEST WILL INVOLVE DETECTING AND RECORDING WEATHER RETURNS USING THE STANDBY ATC RADAR CHANNEL AND SIMULTANEOUSLY RECORDING THE WEATHER RETURNS USING A NEARBY NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE RADAR. THE RECORDED DATA FROM THE TWO RADARS WILL BE REDUCED FOR COMPUTER ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTIVENESS AND IMPROVEMENT DERIVED FROM THE MODIFICATION.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 5/19/1977
Response:

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 4/30/1974
Response: FAA LETTER: THE FAA KNOWS OF NO CURRENTLY AVAILABLE RADAR SYSTEM WHICH IS SUITABLE FOR AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL PURPOSES AND CAN ALSO BE USED TO DISPLAY SEVERE WEATHER AND CONVECTIVE TURBULENCE. THE FAA'S SYSTEMS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SERVICE IS EXPLORING WITH THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE THE FEASIBILITY OF DEVELOPING AND TESTING TECHNIQUES TO PROVIDE AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL SPECIALISTS WITH HAZARDOUS WEATHER DATA ON A DISPLAY FOR USE IN PROVIDING ADVISORY SERVICE AS WELL AS IN CARRYING OUT SEVERE WEATHER AVOIDANCE PROCEDURES.