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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-16-046
Details
Synopsis: On November 10, 2015, about 1453 eastern standard time, Execuflight flight 1526, a British Aerospace HS 125-700A (Hawker 700A), N237WR, departed controlled flight while on a nonprecision localizer approach to runway 25 at Akron Fulton International Airport (AKR) and impacted a four-unit apartment building in Akron, Ohio. The captain, first officer, and seven passengers died; no one on the ground was injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and postcrash fire. The airplane was registered to Rais Group International NC LLC and operated by Execuflight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 as an on-demand charter flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight departed from Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport, Dayton, Ohio, about 1413 and was destined for AKR.
Recommendation: TO SIMCOM AVIATION TRAINING AND FLIGHT SAFETY INTERNATIONAL: Work with the Federal Aviation Administration and Textron Aviation to develop and incorporate into Hawker 700-and 800-series pilot training programs a definition of the term “landing assured” that aligns with the language of 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91.175(c)(1).
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Open - Acceptable Response
Mode: Aviation
Location: Akron, OH, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: CEN16MA036
Accident Reports: Crash During Nonprecision Instrument Approach to Landing Execuflight Flight 1526 British Aerospace HS 125-700A, N237WR
Report #: AAR-16-03
Accident Date: 11/10/2015
Issue Date: 11/3/2016
Date Closed:
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: Flight Safety International (Open - Await Response)
SimCom Aviation Training (Open - Acceptable Response)
Keyword(s):

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: SimCom Aviation Training
Date: 4/24/2019
Response: You said that “landing assured” is defined in CFR 91.175(c)(1) and that you have incorporated this definition into your training programs. We point out, however, that CFR 91.175(c)(1) does not define “landing assured”; rather, the regulation only provides the regulatory conditions for descending below the minimum decent altitude (MDA). Please submit the sections from your Hawker 700- and 800 series aircraft training program that address “landing assured” so we can better evaluate if your definition aligns with the language in CFR 91.175(c)(1). As discussed in our response to A-16-45, we are aware that the FAA has assigned an AEG to evaluate the Hawker 700- and 800-series aircraft training. We are also aware that the AEG will include, as part of its evaluation, the definition of “landing assured.” We believe that the findings from the AEG’s evaluation could be useful in determining an appropriate definition for “landing assured.” Pending our review of the findings from the AEG’s evaluation and the relevant sections of your Hawker 700- and 800-series aircraft training program, Safety Recommendation A-16-46 is classified OPEN--ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: SimCom Aviation Training
To: NTSB
Date: 1/4/2019
Response: -From Michael Young, Director of Operations: In response to your letter dated October 2, 2018, SIMCOM Aviation Training offers the following comments: Reference recommendation A-16-45: SIMCOM Aviation Training has long recognized the destabilizing effect of low altitude configuration changes and discourages the practice in aircraft types across our programs. In the Hawker, SIMCOM has trained and continues to train landings with flaps in approach as well as flaps full depending on performance criteria driven by runway length, etc. with final configuration prior to the final approach fix. Reference recommendation A-16-46: SIMCOM Aviation Training asserts that while it may be useful to include a definition of “landing assured” in training programs, the regulation 91.175(c)(1), defines that concept quite well and is already incorporated into the training and checking/testing criteria in all training programs. Our instructors and TCE’s understand landing assurance as part of aeronautical decision making and incorporate this concept in both training and testing. It is my hope that these comments will satisfy the board’s recommendations.

From: NTSB
To: SimCom Aviation Training
Date: 10/2/2018
Response: We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others. We normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years, and we have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement the recommendations; until then, they retain their current classification of OPEN--AWAIT RESPONSE. Please update us at correspondence@ntsb.gov regarding your actions to address Safety Recommendations A 16 45 and 46, and do not submit both an electronic and a hard copy of the same response.

From: NTSB
To: SimCom Aviation Training
Date: 11/3/2016
Response: On October 18, 2016, we adopted our report concerning the November 10, 2015, accident in which in which a British Aerospace HS 125-700A (Hawker 700A), N237WR, registered to Rais Group International NC LLC and operated by Execuflight, departed controlled flight while on a nonprecision localizer approach to runway 25 at Akron Fulton International Airport and impacted a four-unit apartment building in Akron, Ohio. Additional information about this accident and the resulting recommendations may be found in the report of the investigation, which can be accessed at our Aviation Information Resources webpage under report number NTSB/AAR-16/03.1 As a result of this investigation, we issued 13 new recommendations, including 9 to the Federal Aviation Administration, 2 to Textron Aviation, and the following 2 to Hawker 700-and -800 series training centers, such as SIMCOM Aviation Training. The NTSB is vitally interested in these recommendations because they are designed to prevent accidents and save lives. We would appreciate receiving a response from you within 90 days detailing the actions you have taken or intend to take to implement them.

From: NTSB
To: Flight Safety International
Date: 10/2/2018
Response: We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others. We normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years, and we have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement the recommendations; until then, they retain their current classification of OPEN--AWAIT RESPONSE. Please update us at correspondence@ntsb.gov regarding your actions to address Safety Recommendations A 16 45 and 46, and do not submit both an electronic and a hard copy of the same response.

From: NTSB
To: Flight Safety International
Date: 11/3/2016
Response: On October 18, 2016, we adopted our report concerning the November 10, 2015, accident in which in which a British Aerospace HS 125-700A (Hawker 700A), N237WR, registered to Rais Group International NC LLC and operated by Execuflight, departed controlled flight while on a nonprecision localizer approach to runway 25 at Akron Fulton International Airport and impacted a four-unit apartment building in Akron, Ohio. Additional information about this accident and the resulting recommendations may be found in the report of the investigation, which can be accessed at our Aviation Information Resources webpage under report number NTSB/AAR-16/03.1 As a result of this investigation, we issued 13 new recommendations, including 9 to the Federal Aviation Administration, 2 to Textron Aviation, and the following 2 to Hawker 700-and -800 series training centers, such as Flight Safety International. The NTSB is vitally interested in these recommendations because they are designed to prevent accidents and save lives. We would appreciate receiving a response from you within 90 days detailing the actions you have taken or intend to take to implement them.