Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-14-104
Details
Synopsis: On March 30, 2013, at 2320 Alaska daylight time, a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, N911AA, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search and rescue (SAR) flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. The airline transport pilot, an Alaska state trooper serving as a flight observer for the pilot, and a stranded snowmobiler who had requested rescue were killed, and the helicopter was destroyed by impact and postcrash fire. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) as a public aircraft operations flight under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed in the area at the time of the accident. The flight originated at 2313 from a frozen pond near the snowmobiler’s rescue location and was destined for an off-airport location about 16 mi south.
Recommendation: TO FORTY FOUR STATES, THE COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTO RICO AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Create a formal tactical flight officer (TFO) training program that includes training on aeronautical decision-making, crew resource management, and operating aircraft navigational and communications equipment, and use TFOs during search and rescue operations.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Open - Await Response
Mode: Aviation
Location: Talkeetna, AK, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: ANC13GA036
Accident Reports: ​Crash Following Encounter with Instrument Meteorological Conditions After Departure from Remote Landing Site Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter AS350 B3, N911AA
Report #: AAR-14-03
Accident Date: 3/30/2013
Issue Date: 11/24/2014
Date Closed:
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: Commonwealth of Kentucky (Open - Await Response)
Commonwealth of Massachusetts (Open - Await Response)
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (Closed - Exceeds Recommended Action)
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Open - Acceptable Response)
Commonwealth of Virginia (Open - Await Response)
District of Columbia (Open - Await Response)
State of Alabama (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of Alaska (Open - Acceptable Response)
State of Arizona (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of Arkansas (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of California (Open - Await Response)
State of Colorado (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of Connecticut (Open - Await Response)
State of Delaware (Closed - Exceeds Recommended Action)
State of Florida (Open - Acceptable Response)
State of Georgia (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of Illinois (Closed - Acceptable Action)
State of Indiana (Open - Await Response)
State of Iowa (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of Kansas (Open - Acceptable Response)
State of Louisiana (Open - Await Response)
State of Maine (Open - Await Response)
State of Maryland (Closed - Exceeds Recommended Action)
State of Michigan (Closed - Acceptable Action)
State of Minnesota (Open - Acceptable Response)
State of Mississippi (Open - Await Response)
State of Missouri (Open - Await Response)
State of Montana (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of Nebraska (Open - Await Response)
State of Nevada (Open - Await Response)
State of New Hampshire (Open - Await Response)
State of New Jersey (Closed - Exceeds Recommended Action)
State of New Mexico (Open - Await Response)
State of New York (Open - Await Response)
State of North Carolina (Closed - Exceeds Recommended Action)
State of North Dakota (Open - Await Response)
State of Ohio (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of Oklahoma (Closed - Exceeds Recommended Action)
State of Oregon (Open - Await Response)
State of South Carolina (Open - Await Response)
State of South Dakota (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of Tennessee (Open - Await Response)
State of Texas (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of Utah (Closed - Acceptable Action)
State of Washington (Closed - Reconsidered)
State of West Virginia (Open - Await Response)
State of Wisconsin (Open - Await Response)
Keyword(s):

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: State of Alaska
Date: 3/30/2015
Response: We note that, although you do not currently have a TFO program in place, you intend to implement one in the future. In the meantime, we are encouraged to learn that, when possible, you conduct high risk helicopter SAR missions with dual pilots. Pending our receipt and review of updates regarding your progress to implement a TFO program, Safety Recommendation A 14-104 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: State of Alaska
To: NTSB
Date: 12/16/2014
Response: -From Gary Folger, Commissioner, Department of Public Safety: Alaska Department of Public Safety recognizes the need to create and implement a tactical flight officer (TFO) program. DPS currently utilizes other qualified pilots, when possible, to assist in high risk turbine helicopter search and rescue missions. The additional pilot onboard relieves pressure on operations of aircraft navigational and communications equipment. DPS will continue to explore ways to implement a formalized TFO program that utilizes current employees within the department.

From: NTSB
To: State of Alabama
Date: 5/4/2015
Response: We are pleased to learn that ALEA has a formal TFO training program in place, and we commend the agency for implementing this program before we issued Safety Recommendation A 14 104. Accordingly, the recommendation is classified CLOSED—RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Alabama
To: NTSB
Date: 2/9/2015
Response: -From J. Spencer Collier, Secretary, Alabama Law Enforcement Agency: The formal tactical flight officer (TFO) program was established in 2007 and has been revised several times since. It includes rescue flight operations as well as the established procedures for FUR training and air-to-ground tactics for locating fugitives and missing persons. It also includes IIMC emergency procedures and crew resource management. See attached rescue program manual and TFO training manual in the attachment (ref. A-14-104 1.1,1.2).

From: NTSB
To: State of Arizona
Date: 1/18/2018
Response: We are pleased to learn that the AZDPS has a formal TFO training program and requires a TFO on all SAR operations. Because these practices have been in place for over 30 years, Safety Recommendation A-14-104 is classified CLOSED--RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Arizona
To: NTSB
Date: 9/13/2017
Response: Terry S. Miyauchi, Aviation Administrator, Arizona Department of Public Safety: The purpose of this letter is to respond to your safety recommendations letter addressed to Governor Doug Ducey, dated August 3, 2017. In that letter, NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13-21 (meteorological evaluation towers) andA-14-100 through 106 (search-and-rescue flight) were provided to the State of Arizona. The Arizona Department of Public Safety (AZDPS) conducts flights across the entire state of Arizona, to include areas where meteorological towers have been erected. Approximately 25% percent of all flights for AZDPS and the State are in support of search and rescue operations. We value the goal of aviation safety as the number one priority for all of our aviation activity and your recommendations are well received. We offer the following specific responses to each of your NTSB recommendations: AZDPS has a well-established TFO program that has been in place for more than 30 years. The initial FTO training program is currently 16 weeks in duration and includes in-depth aeronautical decision making, crew resource management, operating aircraft navigational and communications equipment, as well as many other aspects related to search-and-rescue operations. The initial training program is culminated with a series of scenario based evaluations that encompasses all of the above mentioned. The AZDPS FTO program additionally mandates refresher training and annual evaluation. AZDPS not only utilizes FTO's in search-and-rescue operations, but mandates them as minimum essential crew.

From: NTSB
To: State of Arizona
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Arizona on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Arizona on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Arkansas
Date: 12/15/2017
Response: We are pleased to learn that, in 2011, the ASP implemented a formal TFO training program, and that TFOs are used during all SAR operations. Because this program was in place before we issued Safety Recommendation A-14-104, the recommendation is classified CLOSED--RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Arkansas
To: NTSB
Date: 8/29/2017
Response: -From Asa Hutchinson, Governor: Arkansas has in place a formal TFO training program that meets or exceeds NTSB recommendations.

From: NTSB
To: State of Arkansas
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Arkansas on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Arkansas on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of California
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of California on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of California on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Colorado
Date: 1/3/2018
Response: We note that the Colorado Army National Guard operates helicopters to conduct SAR missions, and that the Colorado State Police does not operate helicopters. We believe that all air operations could benefit from the safety improvements specified in these recommendations, and we urge the state of Colorado to make the recommended safety improvements to all its air operations. However, because these recommendations were specifically aimed at public operators who conduct helicopter SAR operations, Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106 are classified CLOSED--RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Colorado
To: NTSB
Date: 9/13/2017
Response: -From John W. Hickenlooper, Governor: We have enacted recommendation A-13- 21 through legislation, when we signed House Bill 14-1216 into law in 2014. This bill requires safety markings for certain towers over 50 feet in height that are located in unincorporated areas of the state, and has been incorporated into Colorado Revised Statutes (CRS) section 43-10-117. Specifically, CRS 43-10- 117 requires: (2) Where the appearance of a tower is not otherwise governed by state or federal law, rule, or regulation, any tower over fifty feet in height that is located outside the boundaries of an incorporated city or town on land that is primarily rural or undeveloped or used for agricultural purposes must be marked and painted or otherwise constructed to be visible in clear air during daylight hours from a distance of not less than two thousand feet. Towers must also comply with the following additional requirements: (a) A tower must be painted in equal alternating bands of aviation orange and white, beginning with orange at the top of the tower; (b) One marker ball must be attached to the top third of each outside guy wire; and (c) Guy wires must have a seven-foot- long safety sleeve at each anchor point that extends from the anchor point along each guy wire attached to the anchor point. (3) Any tower that was erected prior to August 6, 2014, must be marked as required by the provisions of this section within one year of August 6, 2014. Any tower that is erected on or after August 6, 2014, must be marked as required by this section at the time it is erected. The Colorado Army National Guard operates helicopters that are used in search and rescue missions, and they report that compliance with all recommendations as outlined in your document of August 3, 2017, as it pertains to the operation of helicopters. Finally, the Colorado State Patrol currently implements recommendation A-14-101, using procedures and avionics that allow for up-to-date weather information and assistance with flight risk assessment decisions. While they do not operate helicopters in search and rescue missions, they are considering implementing recommendations A-14-100, A-14-105, and A-14-106 following an independent and unrelated safety audit they are conducting. Once completed, we will incorporate regulations that are in compliance with the NTSB recommendation, at a minimum. Again, thank you for your correspondence regarding this issue. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to my Office should you have any further questions.

From: NTSB
To: State of Colorado
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Colorado on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Colorado on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Connecticut
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Connecticut on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Connecticut on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Delaware
Date: 5/15/2015
Response: We are pleased that you have a formal TFO training program in place and that, in an effort to improve CRM, you also include your pilots in this training. We commend you for exceeding the intent of this recommendation and helping to ensure an even higher level of safety. Accordingly, Safety Recommendation A 14-104 is classified CLOSED—EXCEEDS RECOMMENDED ACTION.

From: State of Delaware
To: NTSB
Date: 12/8/2014
Response: -From Colonel Nathaniel McQueen, Jr., Superintendent, Delaware Department of Safety and Homeland Security, Division of State Police: During 2014 all section members received TFO specific training to enhance crew resource management. Section members completed the 2-day Tactical Flying TFO course taught by Kevin Means and a one day Crew Resource Management Course taught by Dudley Crosson of DeltaP Consulting. These courses enhanced section TFO and aircrew capabilities. During 2015, the section has budgeted for all Medic/TFO’s to attend the Bell Training Academy Tactical Flight Officer Course. The course is a 24 hour course of instruction that includes ground and simulator training. In addition to the Bell TFO Course, two section TFO/Medics will attend the LAPD TFO course to develop their skills further and will become TFO Trainers in our organization. Our current program will brought in compliance with ALEA TFO Training program accreditation standards during 2015.

From: NTSB
To: District of Columbia
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the District of Columbia on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the District of Columbia on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Florida
Date: 5/4/2015
Response: We are encouraged to learn that the FWC is in the process of establishing a formal TFO program. Pending completion of the recommended action, Safety Recommendation A 14-104 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: State of Florida
To: NTSB
Date: 1/30/2015
Response: -From Colonel Curtis Brown, Director, Division of Law Enforcement, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission: FWC is currently in the process of updating the f1ight manual and drafting a training document, which will establish a TFO training program encompassing the items listed in A-14-104.

From: NTSB
To: State of Georgia
Date: 3/6/2015
Response: We are pleased to learn that your TFO training program was implemented in 1997 and includes the recommended initial and recurrent training. Because your program was implemented before Safety Recommendation A-14-104 was issued, the recommendation is classified CLOSED—RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Georgia
To: NTSB
Date: 12/8/2014
Response: -From Colonel Mark McDonough, Commissioner, Department of Public Safety: Tactical Flight Officers (TFOs) complete a basic 40 hours Tactical Flight Officer Training Program. The program introduces students to the following: • initial training on all thermal imaging systems, • operation and basic maintenance of the systems, • operation of the downlink systems on board the aircraft, • situational awareness while outside and inside the cockpit, • crew resource management in assisting the pilot with radios and navigational task while in flight, and • emergency procedures. TFOs are introduced to the operation of navigational equipment and how to operate the navigational equipment when needed. Scenarios are conducted allowing the TFO to search for and locate a subject with the thermal camera while being evaluated by a senior TFO. Upon completion of the initial TFO training program, the TFO is required to attend monthly training.

From: NTSB
To: State of Illinois
Date: 6/10/2015
Response: We are pleased to learn that ISP’s flight crews include a second pilot (observer) who is trained to assist the pilot flying with aeronautical decision making, crew resource management, and the use of onboard navigation and communication equipment. Accordingly, Safety Recommendation A-14-104 is classified CLOSED—ACCEPTABLE ACTION.

From: State of Illinois
To: NTSB
Date: 2/26/2015
Response: -From Leo P. Schmitz, Director, Illinois State Police: The ISP AOB utilizes certified pilots as observers. As such, they are trained in aeronautical decision-making, crew resource management and operating navigational and communications equipment. Typically, they fly one day and act as the observer the next day.

From: NTSB
To: State of Indiana
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Indiana on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Indiana on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Iowa
Date: 10/26/2017
Response: We note that the state of Iowa does not conduct helicopter SAR operations; however, we believe that all air operations could benefit from the safety improvements specified in these recommendations. Accordingly, we urge the state of Iowa to make the safety improvements discussed in these recommendations to all its air operations. Because these recommendations were specifically aimed at public operators who conduct helicopter SAR operations, though, Safety Recommendations A 14-100 through -106 are classified CLOSED--RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Iowa
To: NTSB
Date: 8/10/2017
Response: -From Tim McClung, Iowa DOT, Office of Aviation: Thank you for the NTSB’s August 3, 2017 letter to Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds regarding NTSB safety recommendations A-14-100 through -106. The letter indicates the recommendations were issued as a result of the investigation into an accident involving a Eurocopter AS350 B3 owned and operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety. Iowa does not own or operate helicopters for use in public safety efforts and therefore does not engage in Night Vision Goggle operations, off airport landings, or operations in mountainous areas. Accordingly, the recommendations would not apply. This communication is intended to provide information needed to close the response status for Iowa on these recommendations. Please let me know if you need additional information.

From: NTSB
To: State of Iowa
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106. We issued these recommendations to the state of Iowa on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search and rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 2 years ago. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Kansas
Date: 5/4/2015
Response: We note that you do not currently have a TFO training program and that you believe TFO training programs should be tailored to the unique operations of an organization. We agree; however, we point out that, because TFOs usually assist with equipment operation (including systems used for aviation navigation, mapping, recording, and tracking) and collision avoidance and serve in a tactical decision-making capacity, all TFO training programs should include the basic elements we recommend. Pending our receipt and review of updates regarding your progress in developing the recommended program, Safety Recommendation A 14-104 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: State of Kansas
To: NTSB
Date: 1/30/2015
Response: -From Mark A. Bruce, Colonel, Superintendent, Kansas Highway Patrol: Recently we received a copy of the NTSB's proposed safety recommendations (attached) from your office. We have reviewed them and assessed the impact to KHP aircraft operations. We anticipate the impact to be similar in nature to other law enforcement aircraft operations within the state of Kansas. Below is our assessment and response to those specific NTSB safety recommendations. We appreciate the spirit and nature of the recent recommendations (A-14-100 through -106) provided by the NTSB in their letter dated November 24, 2014. We have not taken the recommendations lightly and have reviewed them for their well-intentioned benefits. Part of our review has included the referenced accident involving the Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter in March of 2013. Keeping the purpose of the recommendations in mind, as well as our already high commitment to safety, we must mention that a considerable obstacle to implementation of several of the proposed measures is cost. Many states and their government agencies have fiscal challenges, and the Kansas Highway Patrol is no exception. While a price cannot be put on a life, we have a responsibility to the public we serve with the very nature of the services we provide, as well as to the employees we request to carry out those services. In return for our responses, we would very much appreciate reciprocation by being provided the responses of other agencies from other states as well. Their opinions and recommendations could be quite valuable. This would also encourage an open dialogue without unintentionally suppressing potentially innovative methods to pursue best practices in a more cost effective manner. Implementation of a Tactical Flight Officer (TFO) training program would be agreeable and beneficial to agencies. However, the programs should be designed by each agency to address their specific needs. Courses for providing guidance in designing programs should be standardized with flexible and general guidelines while being readily available to agencies at little to no expense in order to encourage participation. The KHP, like most other law enforcement agencies, are not in a position to readily absorb significant additional "mandated" costs.

From: NTSB
To: Commonwealth of Kentucky
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106. We issued these recommendations to the commonwealth of Kentucky on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 2 years ago. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Louisiana
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Louisiana on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Louisiana on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Maine
Date: 7/5/2018
Response: On March 26, 2018, Major Christopher Grotton, MSP, informed our staff that the MSP operates two fixed wing aircraft, mostly for law enforcement missions. Major Grotton reported that the MSP does not operate any helicopters, but that the Maine Forest Service operates helicopters. On April 5, 2018, Mr. John Crowley, Maine Forest Service, informed our staff that the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is the state organization responsible for conducting SAR missions; however, because the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife does not operate any helicopters, the Maine Forest Service assists with SAR missions that require the use of helicopters. Because these recommendations were specifically aimed at public operators who conduct helicopter SAR operations, we believe that the Maine Forest Service is the appropriate state organization to respond to Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, and Mr. Crowley informed us that he is in the process of developing a response. Pending our receipt of this information, Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106 remain classified OPEN--AWAIT RESPONSE.

From: State of Maine
To: NTSB
Date: 2/12/2018
Response: -From Major Christopher Grotton, Maine State Police, Support Services Division: This letter is in response to the NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13-21 and A-14-100 through -106 issued to the State of Maine in an August 2017 letter to Governor LePage. The Maine State Police Air Wing has a small profile within the overall scope of aviation operations conducted within the State of Maine. We have two fixed wing aircraft in our inventory with no rotary wing asset. Our core mission is primarily traffic related flights which are conducted during the daylight and in VFR conditions only. Any night VFR or day/night IFR flights that are requested would typically be administrative in nature and would be conducted operating under part 91 regulations. When requested, we assist other aviation assets and agencies within the state under the conditions that the flight can be done within the confines of our Standard Operating Procedures Manual and our General Orders that pertains to the Air Wing. Any search and rescue mission that we would be involved in would be conducted during daylight VFR only conditions. Our aircraft are equipped with wheels only and are not allowed to perform "off-site" landings. We are restricted to published airports only. Those flights would also be conducted utilizing part 91 regulations. I am in hopes that this information provides some context for our air operations and the applicability of the recommendations in your August 2017 letter. Our responses (below) to each of your recommendations are crafted within the context of our mission. This is not applicable as we do not utilize Tactical Flight Officers. We will, when needed, utilize observers for traffic avoidance when the condition dictates, but there is no equipment in the aircraft for them to operate. They are observers only.

From: NTSB
To: State of Maine
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Maine on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Maine on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Maryland
Date: 7/15/2015
Response: We understand that the MSP conducts all aircraft operations with two pilots, a flight paramedic, and a rescue technician. Although the MSP does not use TFOs, its policy of including a second pilot on all flights who is trained to assist the pilot in command as a TFO exceeds the intent of this recommendation. Accordingly, Safety Recommendation A-14-104 is classified CLOSED—EXCEEDS RECOMMENDED ACTION.

From: State of Maryland
To: NTSB
Date: 3/25/2015
Response: From Michael W. DeRuggiero, Safety Management Officer, Aviation Command, Maryland State Police: In April of 2013, a decision was made by the MSPAC Command Staff to operate the A W -13 9 helicopters with two pilots. The decision to utilize a two pilot flight crew was made due to the complexity of the helicopter and in part, because the MSPAC concurs with the NTSB's belief that a second pilot may have prevented the fatal accident involving MSPAC's Aerospatiale SA365N1 helicopter, N92MD, which occurred in District Heights, Maryland on September 27, 2008. In April of2013, the MSPAC elected to conduct all civil and public aircraft operations in the A W-13 9 helicopter with two pilots, a flight paramedic (crew chief) and a rescue technician, which the MSPAC believes negates the need to create a formal tactical flight officer (TFO) position and/or training program. However, the MSP AC does provide aeronautical decision-making, aeromedical crew resource management during initial, recurrent, requalification and upgrade ground and flight training, consistent with the requirements of CFR 135.

From: NTSB
To: Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the commonwealth of Massachusetts on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the commonwealth of Massachusetts on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Michigan
Date: 6/10/2015
Response: We are pleased to learn that the MSP has a formal TFO training program and a TFO sergeant who has received TFO-specific training. Accordingly, Safety Recommendation A 14 104 is classified CLOSED—ACCEPTABLE ACTION.

From: State of Michigan
To: NTSB
Date: 1/23/2015
Response: -From Col. Kriste Kibbey Etue, Director, Michigan State Police and Kirk T. Steudle, Director, Michigan Department of Transportation: • The MSP Aviation Unit created a TFO sergeant position in 2014 and added four additional trooper TFOs who began formal training in January 2015 with two weeks of classroom work and multiple weeks of training in the aircraft. The TFO sergeant attended a week-long TFO school with the Los Angeles Police Department and assisted in creating the MSP TFO training agenda. • MDOT Aero has a designated Safety Officer to develop and maintain training standards in all areas of flight operations. Standards are being developed consistent with the SMS best practices.

From: NTSB
To: State of Minnesota
Date: 5/4/2015
Response: We note that the MSP does not currently have a TFO training program, but that it intends to develop and implement one in the future. Pending our receipt and review of updates regarding the MSP’s progress, Safety Recommendation A 14-104 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: State of Minnesota
To: NTSB
Date: 1/30/2015
Response: -From Colonel Matthew C. Langer, Chief, Minnesota State Patrol: The MSP will formalize its TFO training program to include the recommendations by the NTSB.

From: NTSB
To: State of Mississippi
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Mississippi on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Mississippi on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Missouri
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Missouri on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Missouri on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Montana
Date: 10/26/2017
Response: We note that the Montana Highway Patrol (MHP) operates two aircraft for law enforcement missions; however, as Mr. John Spencer, MHP, informed our staff on October 4, 2017, SAR operations are not the MHP’s primary mission, but fall under the purview of the county sheriff’s offices. We believe that all air operations could benefit from the safety improvements specified in these recommendations, and we urge the state of Montana to make the recommended safety improvements to all its air operations. However, because these recommendations were specifically aimed at public operators who conduct helicopter SAR operations, Safety Recommendations A 14-100 through -106 are classified CLOSED--RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Montana
To: NTSB
Date: 8/18/2017
Response: -From Mike Tooley, Director, Montana Department of Transportation: The State of Montana appreciates the leadership your agency has provided to enhance and promote the safety of law enforcement public aircraft operations across the nation. The Montana Highway Patrol (MHP) operates a 1971 Bell OH-58A helicopter and a 1978 Cessna 182-RG airplane in its law enforcement mission, with a single officer responsible for all flying duties. Total flight hours are less than 100 hours per year. The MHP flight department has considered the NTSB Safety Recommendations and has implemented them in the following manner: Training is underway for Tactical Flight Officers through the approved program of the Airborne Law Enforcement Association, conducted at their annual conference. The program includes training on NVG.

From: NTSB
To: State of Montana
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106. We issued these recommendations to the state of Montana on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue (SAR) flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 2 years ago. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Nebraska
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 2 years ago. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE.

From: NTSB
To: State of Nevada
Date: 8/2/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Nevada on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Nevada on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of New Hampshire
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of New Hampshire on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of New Hampshire on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of New Jersey
Date: 6/24/2015
Response: We note that all members of the NJSP aircrew (pilots, co-pilots, and hoist operators) have a commercial rotorcraft license with instrument rating. Although the NJSP does not utilize TFOs, its policy of including a second pilot on all flights who is trained to assist the pilot in command as a TFO exceeds the intent of this recommendation. Accordingly, Safety Recommendation A-14-104 is classified CLOSED—EXCEEDS RECOMMENDED ACTION.

From: State of New Jersey
To: NTSB
Date: 2/26/2015
Response: -From Joseph R. Fuentes, Colonel, Superintendent: The New Jersey State Police does not utilize TFOs. Most members of the Bureau hold an airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate. At a minimum, any members of the Aviation Bureau who serve as aircrew (pilot, co-pilot, hoist operator) possess a FAA commercial rotorcraft license with instrument rating and are intimately familiar with aeronautical decision making, crew resource management, and operating the aircraft navigational and communications equipment.

From: NTSB
To: State of New Mexico
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of New Mexico on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of New Mexico on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of New York
Date: 8/2/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of New York on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of New York on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of “Open—Await Response.” For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of North Carolina
Date: 6/10/2015
Response: We note that, although SHP does not have a TFO program, all pilots are required to complete a co-pilot training program before they can act as PIC. SHP’s policy of including a co-pilot on all flights who is trained to assist the PIC as a TFO exceeds the intent of this recommendation. Accordingly, Safety Recommendation A-14-104 is classified CLOSED—EXCEEDS RECOMMENDED ACTION.

From: State of North Carolina
To: NTSB
Date: 2/5/2015
Response: -From William Grey, Colonel, Commanding, North Carolina Department of Public Safety, State Highway Patrol: 1. We recognize the seriousness and the hazardous environment of conducting law enforcement aviation missions and therefore do not utilize part-time Tactical Flight Officers or ad-hoc flight crewmembers. All flight crewmembers are licensed pilots who are on a career path specializing in law enforcement aviation. 2. All members of our organization who are offered a position within Aircraft Operations are required to complete a Co-Pilot Training program. This program provides specialized instruction to the member in aeronautical decision making, crew resource management, operation of aircraft equipment, search and rescue techniques, our Safety Management System and Standard Operating Procedures. 3. Members are held to a high standard of performance. Inability to meet performance standards results in a reassignment within the agency.

From: NTSB
To: State of North Dakota
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106. We issued these recommendations to the state of North Dakota on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 2 years ago. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Ohio
Date: 3/17/2015
Response: We are pleased that you have a formal TFO training program in place and that all of your TFOs are pilots. Because your program was in place prior to the issuance of Safety Recommendation A 14-104, the recommendation is classified CLOSED—RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Ohio
To: NTSB
Date: 12/18/2014
Response: -From Cari R. Maines, Ohio State Highway Patrol, Office of the Superintendent: The Ohio State Highway Patrol’s Aviation Section was started in 1947 with the approval of Senate Bill 221. The following year we made the purchase of one fixed wing bonanza. The original mission intent was for disaster relief, air searches, transportation, aerial photography, and errands of mercy. We had one aircraft and one pilot. Today, 67 years later, we have 16 pilots, 1 office assistant, and 16 aircraft. Annually, we log around 7,000 flight hours. Our fleet includes: • 2 Cessna 172R Skyhawk fixed wing airplanes • 2 Cessna 182S Skylane fixed wing airplanes • 9 Cessna 182T Skylane fixed wing airplanes • 1 Cessna 208B Caravan fixed wing airplane • 2 American Eurocopter AS350B2 helicopters Our primary mission is aerial traffic enforcement, and it comprises approximately 85% of our flight time. The remaining flight time is spent conducting other missions, including: • Searches (stranded motorists, downed aircraft, lost children, elderly walkaways, drowning victims, manhunts, etc.) • Surveillance (criminal interdiction, reconnaissance) • Photo flights (crashes, evidentiary, reconnaissance) • Drug interdiction flights including marijuana eradication • Emergency transportation (personnel, blood relays) • Special response team operations • Training Since our inception, we have suffered three crashes. Two of those were fatal fixed wing crashes (1970 & 1976) and the other was a minor injury helicopter crash in 1993. Since 1976, we have accumulated over 250,000 hours of accident free fixed wing flight. Our operations are a bit unique compared to most state agencies. We only use personnel assigned to the Aviation Section as part of our flight crew. Every Trooper / Pilot has spent time in the field as a State Trooper. State Troopers applying for a Trooper/Pilot position must possess a Private Pilot’s License (Airplane – Single Engine Land) with an Instrument Rating prior to appointment. After spending some time in the Section, some of our pilots are then trained as Tactical Flight Officers. Our helicopter pilots are also chosen from among the Section’s fixed wing pilots. We make a concerted effort to make safety our highest priority. We believe that “If it’s predictable, it’s preventable.” We are proud to say that every recommendation issued was either current practice or being developed. The following paragraphs summarize the actions we have planned and/or taken during implementation of the NTSB recommendations. All of our tactical flight officers (TFOs) are pilots. We require (at a minimum) an airplane single engine land (FAA license) with instrument airplane rating in order to apply for a position within the Section. Upon selection, the new Trooper / Pilot undergoes a formal initial pilot training program. This training includes aeronautical decision-making (ADM), crew resource management (CRM), and operating aircraft navigational and communications equipment. After completing this initial training and building some time in the Section as a fixed wing pilot, some of our pilots will then begin TFO training. This training again emphasizes ADM, CRM, and operating navigational and communications equipment in the different aerial platforms we employ. Additionally, all of our pilots attend an annual ADM and CRM refresher course. We believe that these are mandatory skills for a safe and effective flight crew. We also feel that these skills are perishable and therefore re-emphasized annually. These formal training programs have been in place since 2002.

From: NTSB
To: State of Oklahoma
Date: 12/15/2017
Response: We note that, although the OHP does not have a formal TFO program, it operates only in a dual-pilot configuration. This practice exceeds the intent of Safety Recommendation A 14 104, which is classified CLOSED--EXCEEDS RECOMMENDED ACTION.

From: State of Oklahoma
To: NTSB
Date: 8/16/2017
Response: -From Michael C. Thompson, Commissioner, Oklahoma Department of Public Safety: The Oklahoma Highway Patrol does not actively utilize a formal TFO program but maintains an internal policy that all flights require two (2) pilots with one (1) acting as pilot in command of the aircraft and the 211d officer acting as TFO. However, the department has begun conducting informal TFO training for non-pilot troopers that include training in crew resource management, IR camera operations, aviation physiology, radio communications, navigation, GPS operations, weight and balance, F ARI AIM resources and weather considerations. This program for non-pilots is not currently utilized due to funding and the fact that the agency already utilizes two pilots for each mission.

From: NTSB
To: State of Oklahoma
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106. We issued these recommendations to the state of Oklahoma on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 2 years ago. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of “Open—Await Response.” For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Oregon
Date: 8/2/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Oregon on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Oregon on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of “Open—Await Response.” For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Date: 1/19/2018
Response: We are pleased to learn that the PSP operates search operations in a dual-pilot configuration, that its helicopters are equipped with autopilots, and that its pilots are trained to use the technology. Because these practices exceed the intent of Safety Recommendation A-14-104, the recommendation is classified CLOSED--EXCEEDS RECOMMENDED ACTION.

From: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
To: NTSB
Date: 11/2/2017
Response: -Leslie S. Richards, Secretary Department of Transportation, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania: PSP does not use TFOs. We endeavor to conduct flight, specifically searches, with two pilots. Additionally, all of our mission helicopters will have a two-axis autopilot and all pilots will be trained to use it.

From: NTSB
To: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Date: 8/2/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the commonwealth of Pennsylvania on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the commonwealth of Pennsylvania on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
Date: 6/10/2015
Response: We are encouraged to learn that the PRPD’s crew chiefs (TFOs) receive formal training that addresses aeronautical decision making, crew resource management, and the use of onboard navigation and communication equipment. However, we would like to know whether the PRPD uses a crew chief during all SAR operations. We believe it is especially important to include a second crewmember (such as a TFO or second pilot) on these operations to reduce the flying pilot’s workload and his or her potential for distraction. Pending our receipt and review of this additional information, Safety Recommendation A-14-104 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
To: NTSB
Date: 2/23/2015
Response: -From Jose L. Caldero Lopez, P.R.P.D. Superintendent, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico: The training for pilots and crew chiefs includes the analysis, understanding and application of Aeronautical Decision Making (ADM), Crew Resource Management (CRM) and the effective utilization of all flight equipment and communication to be used during each mission. As of date in our Region, we rely on a training program whose director is certified by the FAA, as a flight instructor (CFI) and is a Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE) for San Juan FAA District Office. This Director works in conjunction with a staff of instructors, maintain the pilots and crew chiefs updated on all related topics.

From: NTSB
To: State of South Carolina
Date: 8/2/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of South Carolina on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of South Carolina on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of South Dakota
Date: 2/22/2018
Response: On January 16, 2018, Mr. Ron Hauck, Aviation Service, South Dakota Department of Transportation, infomed our staff that the South Dakota Highway Patrol operates fixed wing aircraft for law enforcement missions; however, the state does not operate any helicopters. We believe that all air operations could benefit from the safety improvements specified in these recommendations, and we urge the state of South Dakota to make the recommended safety improvements to its air operations. However, because these recommendations were specifically aimed at public operators who conduct helicopter SAR operations, Safety Recommendations A 14-100 through -106 are classified CLOSED--RECONSIDERED.

From: State of South Dakota
To: NTSB
Date: 11/21/2017
Response: -From Dennis Daugaard, Governor of South Dakota: As to recommendations A-13-21 and A-14-100 through -106, the South Dakota Highway Patrol has reviewed the recommendations, as well as the NTSB accident report, NTSB/AAR-14/03 PB2014-108877, including the findings, probable cause, and recommendations contained in that report. All flight operations conducted by the state of South Dakota are conducted under FAR Part 91 Rules and all FAR 91 Rules are currently being complied with. South Dakota will continue to conduct all flight operations in accordance with all federal aviation regulations.

From: NTSB
To: State of South Dakota
Date: 8/2/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of South Dakota on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of South Dakota on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of “Open—Await Response.” For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Tennessee
Date: 8/2/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Tennessee on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Tennessee on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: State of Texas
To: NTSB
Date: 9/4/2015
Response: -From Greg Abbott, Governor: Thank you for your letter addressed to former Governor Rick Perry regarding NTSB Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through 106. I am sharing your letter with the Texas Department of Transportation's Aviation Division, which will coordinate with my office in discussing the flight safety issues you addressed. Please let me know if I can assist you in the future.

From: NTSB
To: State of Texas
Date: 4/27/2015
Response: We are pleased to learn that you have had a formal TFO program in place since 2007. Because your program was in place before we issued Safety Recommendation A-14-104, the recommendation is classified CLOSED—RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Texas
To: NTSB
Date: 1/5/2015
Response: -From Steven C. McCraw, Director, Texas Department of Public Safety: AOD has had an official TFO program since 2007. The Flight Operations Manual, chapter 5, explains the duties and defines the TFO program. Below is a small paragraph from the 22 page TFO manual: 05.35.00 TACTICAL FLIGHT OFFICER TRAINING/EVALUATION All DPS Tactical Flight Officers will utilize the Tactical Flight Officer Training Manual for initial and recurrent training. All DPS Tactical Flight Officers will receive a checkride from a member of the DPS Training Staff or an assigned designee approved by the Training Captain at least once annually covering the tasks listed in the Tactical Flight Officer Manual. The Training Staff will cause the Helicopter Standardization/Proficiency Grade Slip for Tactical Flight Officers (Annex #4 page 3) to be completed and added to the TFO's training file.

From: NTSB
To: State of Utah
Date: 12/28/2017
Response: We are pleased to learn that the Aero Bureau has a formal TFO training program, and that TFOs are used during all SAR operations. Accordingly, Safety Recommendation A-14-104 is classified CLOSED--ACCEPTABLE ACTION.

From: State of Utah
To: NTSB
Date: 8/27/2017
Response: -From Keith D. Squires, Commissioner, Department of Public Safety: Starting in 2013, the Aero Bureau implemented a formal TFO program that required initial training for all TFO duties including operating the aircraft communications and navigation equipment. TFOs are now used on all search and rescue missions. With the addition of a hoist to the program last year, because of the complexity of conducting safe hoist operations, training was added to greatly increase the participation of the TFO in aeronautical decision making and crew coordination. This has proven to be so successful with hoist operations, that it is now used in all missions. TFOs are receiving training each month to improve skills and maintain proficiency.

From: NTSB
To: State of Utah
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 2 years ago. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE.

From: NTSB
To: Commonwealth of Virginia
Date: 8/3/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the commonwealth of Virginia on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the commonwealth of Virginia on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Washington
Date: 9/16/2015
Response: We note that the WSP’s Aviation Section does not conduct SAR operations; however, we believe that all air operations could benefit from the safety improvements specified in these recommendations. Because these recommendations were specifically aimed at public operators who conduct SAR operations, however, Safety Recommendations A 14-100, -101 and -103 through -106 are classified CLOSED—RECONSIDERED.

From: State of Washington
To: NTSB
Date: 7/29/2015
Response: -From Lieutenant D. Jim Nobach: Reference our phone conversation on Monday, July 27, 2015 concerning follow-up information regarding the A-14-100 questions, the Washington State Patrol (WSP) Aviation Section does not actively engage in Search and Rescue operations. Therefore, the follow-up information previously requested is no longer required of the WSP. At this time we will consider all A-14-100-106 related requests of WSP satisfied. If you have any additional questions, please contact the Washington State Patrol Aviation Section.

From: NTSB
To: State of Washington
Date: 5/4/2015
Response: We are encouraged to learn that WSP has a formal TFO training program and that a TFO or second pilot is used on an as-needed basis. However, we would like to know whether WSP uses a TFO or second pilot during all SAR operations. We believe it is especially important to include a second crewmember (such as a TFO or second pilot) on these operations to reduce the flying pilot’s workload and his or her potential for distraction. Pending our receipt and review of this additional information, Safety Recommendation A-14-104 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: State of Washington
To: NTSB
Date: 2/20/2015
Response: -From Lieutenant Jim Nobach, Washington State Patrol (WSP) Aviation Chief Pilot: The WSP currently does not assign dedicated Tactical Flight Officer (TFO) to the aviation section. However, pilots are utilized as TFOs when needed. Pilots receive over 64-hours of factory training from FLIR, 24 hours of thermography training sponsored by the Airborne Law Enforcement Association (ALEA), and 16-hours of Augmented Reality Systems (ARS) training from Churchill Navigation. The WSP TFO training program encompasses aeronautical decision-making, crew resource management, communications, specialized equipment, and factory/vendor training. To assure compliance with NTSB recommendations, the WSP will review and update the TFO Training manual, if and/or when, dedicated TFOs are added to the program.

From: NTSB
To: State of West Virginia
Date: 8/1/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of West Virginia on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of West Virginia on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.

From: NTSB
To: State of Wisconsin
Date: 8/2/2017
Response: This letter addresses NTSB Safety Recommendations A-13 21 and A-14-100 through -106. We issued A-13-21 to the state of Wisconsin on May 15, 2013, as a result of our investigations of three accidents in which airplanes inadvertently collided with meteorological evaluation towers, fatally injuring four people. We issued A-14-100 through -106 to the state of Wisconsin on November 24, 2014, as a result of our investigation of the March 30, 2013, accident in which a Eurocopter AS350 B3 helicopter, operated by the Alaska Department of Public Safety, impacted terrain while maneuvering during a search-and-rescue flight near Talkeetna, Alaska. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others, and we normally expect actions to address our recommendations to be completed within 3 to 5 years. We have yet to hear from you regarding your progress toward addressing these recommendations, which were issued more than 4 and 2 years ago, respectively. We would appreciate receiving a response within 90 days indicating any actions you have taken or plan to take to implement these recommendations; until then, these recommendations will retain their current classification of OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE. For additional background information about Safety Recommendation A-13-21, please refer to our May 15, 2013, recommendation transmittal letter. For additional background information about Safety Recommendations A-14-100 through -106, please refer to pages 54 through 63 of our Alaska Department of Public Safety Eurocopter accident report.