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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-11-052
Details
Synopsis: On August 9, 2010, about 1442 Alaska daylight time, a single-engine, turbine-powered, amphibious float-equipped de Havilland DHC-3T airplane, N455A, impacted mountainous, tree-covered terrain about 10 nautical miles (nm) northeast of Aleknagik, Alaska.1 The airline transport pilot and four passengers received fatal injuries, and four passengers received serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage, including deformation and breaching of the fuselage. The flight was operated by GCI Communication Corp. (GCI), of Anchorage, Alaska, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. About the time of the accident, meteorological conditions that met the criteria for marginal visual flight rules (MVFR)2 were reported at Dillingham Airport, Dillingham, Alaska, about 18 nm south of the accident site. No flight plan was filed. The flight departed about 1427 from a GCI-owned private lodge on the shore of Lake Nerka and was en route to a remote sport fishing camp about 52 nm southeast on the Nushagak River. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) determined that the probable cause of this accident was the pilot’s temporary unresponsiveness for reasons that could not be established from the available information. Contributing to the investigation’s inability to determine exactly what occurred in the final minutes of the flight was the lack of a cockpit recorder system with the ability to capture audio, images, and parametric data.
Recommendation: TO THE AIRCRAFT OWNERS AND PILOTS ASSOCIATION: Educate pilots of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight operations about the benefits of notifying passengers about the location and operation of survival and emergency communication equipment on board their airplanes
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Closed - Exceeds Recommended Action
Mode: Aviation
Location: Aleknagik, AK, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: ANC10MA068
Accident Reports: Collision into Mountainous Terrain, GCI Communication Corp. de Havilland DHC-3T, N455A
Report #: AAR-11-03
Accident Date: 8/9/2010
Issue Date: 6/9/2011
Date Closed: 1/15/2013
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (Closed - Exceeds Recommended Action)
Keyword(s): Briefings: Passenger, Communication

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association
Date: 1/15/2013
Response: The NTSB notes that AOPA’s Air Safety Institute produced a video to educate pilots about briefing passengers on the use of emergency communication and survival equipment, including basic VHF radio operation, the use of cell phones and the cockpit ELT switch, egress procedures, and the location of survival gear. We also note that AOPA has (1) developed a printable checklist for use in the aircraft, (2) included a sample passenger safety briefing in its educational video, and (3) has made all of this information available on its website. We believe these additional efforts by AOPA will encourage pilots to include passenger safety briefings as part of their regular operations and will facilitate this effort. These actions both satisfy Safety Recommendation A 11 52 and encourage pilots to ensure a higher level of safety for their passengers; accordingly, the recommendation is classified CLOSED—EXCEEDS RECOMMENDED ACTION.

From: Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association
To: NTSB
Date: 10/25/2012
Response: -From Bruce Landsberg, President, AOPA Foundation: The Air Safety Institute, a division of the non-profit AOPA Foundation, has responded to NTSB Safety Recommendation A-11- 52, dated June 9, 2011, by providing general aviation (GA) pilots an educational safety video and printable checklist about the location and operation of survival and emergency communications equipment on board GA aircraft. Additionally the video includes recommendations for notifying passengers about the proper use of seat belts, harnesses, and doors. The video and printable checklist are available online, free of charge for everyone, at http://www.aopa.org/asf/video/passenger-safety-briefing.html. The new video debuted at AOPA Summit in Palm Springs, CA, earlier this month, and was announced in a special Summit edition of AOPA's e-Pilot newsletter to over 275,000 pilots and aviation enthusiasts. The video will receive additional promotion in future AOPA-related publications. It has already appeared in my blog, Leading Edge. http://blog.aopa.org/leadingedge/?p=3048 The Air Safety Institute's safety education efforts, including safety seminars, internet based training, webinars, accident analysis reports, and flight instructor refresher clinics are now the largest GA safety point of contact. In 2011 alone, our safety programs reached the pilot community 1,900,753 times. We were honored to have you, and members Hart and Rosekind join us a few weeks ago in Frederick. Thank you for the opportunity to work with your team and respond to the NTSB's recommendation in an effort to improve pilot and passenger safety.

From: NTSB
To: Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association
Date: 10/19/2011
Response: The NTSB notes that the AOPA Foundation’s Air Safety Institute plans to produce a video to educate pilots about briefing passengers on the use of emergency communication and survival equipment, including basic VHF radio operation, the use of cell phones and the cockpit ELT switch, egress procedures, and the location of survival gear. We also note that the video will be available to all pilots once it is placed on the AOPA’s website and that the AOPA is considering developing a generic printable checklist for use in the aircraft. The NTSB commends the AOPA for its promptness in addressing this safety issue. Pending completion of the recommended action, Safety Recommendation A-11-52 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association
To: NTSB
Date: 7/25/2011
Response: CC# 201100299: - From Bruce Landsberg, President, AOPA Foundation: The Air Safety Institute, a division of the non-profit AOPA Foundation, has reviewed NTSB Safety Recommendation A-11-52, which reads: Educate pilots of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight operations about the benefits of notifying passengers about the location and operation of survival and emergency communication equipment on board their airplanes. As the charitable giving arm of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association )AOPA), the AOPA Foundation has a broad charter to address the critical challenges of the present and future in four key areas: promoting safety (through the Air Safety Institute), preserving airports, restoring the pilot population, and improving the image of general aviation. The Air Safety Institute, formerly the AOPA Air Safety Foundation, is uniquely qualified to address Safety Recommendation A-11-52 with a 60-year history of pilot safety education. Since 1950, the GA accident rate has decreased by 90 percent – due in large part to our safety education efforts. The Foundation began presenting live safety seminars in the 1970s and continues as the leader in this area with more than 175 free national seminars, reaching over 40,000 pilots annually. In the late 1990s, the Foundation brought the innovation of internet-based training and education directly to the pilot community, and in 2011 400,000 course completions are expected via internet-based education. Other Air Safety Institute pilot education includes flight instructor renewal clinics, accident analysis reports, and webinars. All totaled pilots used ASI products 1,908,213 times in 2010 for information and education related to safety. In response to the Safety Recommendation A-11-52, the Air Safety Institute will produce a safety video to education pilots about briefing passengers on emergency communication and survival equipment. This should increase passenger survival if ever involved in a general aviation accident. It will include knowing basic VHF radio operation, personal locator beacon operation, the use of cell phones and the cockpit ELT switch. Additionally, egress procedures and how to locate survival gear are essential items for passengers to understand. A generic printable checklist is under consideration for use in the aircraft. The eight minute video is expected to launch in September 2011 and will be hosted on the AOPA website and other venues. Pilots will be informed through various outreach methods, such as e-newsletters, print magazines, and e-mail. The communication will reach all 400,000 AOPA members and the video will be open to all pilots. We welcome any additional thoughts NTSB staff may have as we prepare this critical safety information and thank you for the opportunity to further our joint objectives.