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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-09-075
Details
Synopsis: On March 4, 2008, about 1515 central standard time, a Cessna 500, N113SH, registered to Southwest Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Clinic PC of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, entered a steep descent and crashed after colliding in flight with a flock of large birds about 2 minutes after takeoff from Wiley Post Airport (PWA) in Oklahoma City.2 None of the entities associated with the flight claimed to be its operator. The pilot, the second pilot,3 and the three passengers were killed, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and postcrash fire. The flight was operated under 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 with an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight originated from the ramp of Interstate Helicopters (a 14 CFR Part 135 on-demand helicopter operator at PWA) and was en route to Mankato Regional Airport (MKT), Mankato, Minnesota, carrying company executives who worked for United Engines and United Holdings, LLC.
Recommendation: TO THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION: Require all 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 139 airports and 14 CFR Part 121, Part 135, and Part 91 Subpart K aircraft operators to report all wildlife strikes, including, if possible, species identification, to the Federal Aviation Administration National Wildlife Strike Database.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Closed - Acceptable Alternate Action
Mode: Aviation
Location: Oklahoma City, OK, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: DFW08MA076
Accident Reports: Crash of Cessna 500, N113SH, Following an In-Flight Collision with Large Birds
Report #: AAR-09-05
Accident Date: 3/4/2008
Issue Date: 9/29/2009
Date Closed: 6/21/2017
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Closed - Acceptable Alternate Action)
Keyword(s): Reporting,Wildlife

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 6/21/2017
Response: We note that, as an alternative to implementing the recommended requirement, you have developed outreach programs to encourage various industry, state, and aviation groups to report wildlife strikes to the NWSD. We further note that reports of wildlife strikes have continued to increase and that, to assess how effective your programs have been in increasing reporting to the NWSD, you contracted two comprehensive, 5-year analyses on strike reporting trends and gap analyses. The analyses examined strike reporting in two 5-year periods (2004–2008 and 2009–2013) to determine whether voluntary strike reporting had increased. These studies showed that strike reporting increased overall at Part 139 airports by 43 percent and at GA airports by 61 percent. The number of strikes reported in 2009–2013 increased by 42 percent compared to 2004–2008, and the number of individual strike reports submitted increased by 60 percent. Based on these study findings, Safety Recommendation A-09-75 is classified CLOSED—ACCEPTABLE ALTERNATE ACTION.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 5/8/2017
Response: -From Michael P. Huerta, Administrator: Since 20 I 0, the FAA has worked hard to increase strike reporting and has conducted an extensive outreach to industry, states, and aviation groups. The FAA ·s Air Traffic Organization (ATO) now requires ATO personnel to report all wildlife strikes immediately via Mandatory Occurrence Reports. The FAA also produced and distributed over 30.000 '"Report Wildlife Strikes'' awareness posters to 4.000 airports. aviation schools. and the aviation industry in the last 4 years. Additionally. the FAA made it easier to report wildlife strikes electronically and with mobile phones. To assess the effectiveness of its efforts, the FAA contracted two comprehensive 5-year analyses on strike reporting trends and gap analyses. The analyses examined strike reporting in 5-year blocks (2009-2013 and 2004-2008) to determine if voluntary strike reporting has increased. A copy of Richard A. Dolbeer's study mentioned in our previous response can be found at: http://www.faa.gov/airports/airport_safety/wildlife/media/trends-in-wildlife-strike-reporting-1990-2013.pdf. The results showed that the FAA’s efforts were a success. Strike reporting has continued to increase overall at both part 139 airports by 43 percent and at GA airports by 61 percent. Damaging strikes within the airpo11 environment (500 feet above ground level) continue to decrease. The number of strikes reported in 2009-2013 increased by 42 percent compared to 2004-2008. The number of individual strike reports submitted has increased by 60 percent. The FAA 's wildlife program and regulations have proven effective at both increasing strike reporting at part 139 and GA airports, as well as reducing damaging strikes within the airport environment. I believe that the FAA has effectively addressed these safety recommendations and consider our actions complete.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 11/1/2014
Response: We note that, as an alternative to implementing the recommended requirement, you are continuing your outreach programs to various industry, state, and aviation groups to encourage them to report wildlife strikes to the NWSD and that, subsequently, the reports have continued to increase. We also note that bird strike remains sent to the Smithsonian Feather Identification Lab increased by 27 percent in 2013 during the primary migratory months of September and October, as compared to the same 2 months in 2011 and 2012. Finally, we note that you expect Dr. Richard Dolbeer’s new study, using the same methodology as that of his 2009 study, to be completed by late 2014. The results of Dr. Dolbeer’s 2014 study are likely to be the basis for our determining that you have completed the action specified in Safety Recommendation A-09-75. Pending our receipt and review of his findings, which should indicate whether wildlife strike reporting rates are increasing at certificated and general aviation airports, this recommendation remains classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE ALTERNATE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 9/24/2014
Response: -From Michael P. Huerta, Administrator: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is continuing our extensive outreach to various industry, states, and aviation groups by issuing annual wildlife awareness posters. Strikes reported to the National Wildlife Strike Database continued to increase annually through the end of2013. The number of strikes reported in 2013 totaled 11,315, which was an increase of 399 strikes over 2012 numbers. Additionally, bird strike remains sent to the Smithsonian Feather Identification Lab for identification increased by 27 percent in 2013 during the primary migratory months of September and October, as compared to the same two months in both 2011 and 2012. Or. Richard Dolbeer initiated a new study in 2014, working with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Services and using the same methodology as the previously noted 2009 study. The 2009 study concluded that 39 percent of wildlife strikes were being reported. Hopefully, the updated study will confirm that all our outreach efforts have resulted in an increased level of strike reporting. We expect the study to be completed by late 2014. I will provide a copy of the new study and keep the Board informed of the FAA's progress on this safety recommendation by September 2015.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 10/29/2013
Response: We are pleased to learn of the FAA’s efforts thus far to improve reporting of wildlife strikes and look forward to reviewing the findings of Dr. Dolbeer’s study. Pending our receipt and review of these findings, which should indicate whether the wildlife strike reporting rates are increasing at certificated and general aviation airports, Safety Recommendation A-09-75 remains classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE ALTERNATE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 7/24/2013
Response: -From Michael P. Huerta, Administrator: In its May 27,2010, letter, the Board agreed with the FAA that an acceptable alternate response would be to increase strike reporting. Since 2010, the FAA has worked hard to increase strike reporting and has conducted an extensive outreach to industry, states, and aviation groups. In 2011 and 2012, the FAA developed and distributed over 11 ,000 "Report Wildlife Strikes" posters each year to every general aviation airport, aviation school, and FAA office in the country. Additionally, we provided funding and expertise for the following two Airport Cooperative Research Program reports: • "Bird Harassment, Repellent, and Deterrent Techniques for Use on and Near Airports: A Synthesis of Airport Practice" (published by the Transportation Research Board in 201 1 ); and • • "Guidebook for Addressing Aircraft/Wildlife Hazards at General Aviation Airports" (published by the Transportation Research Board in 2010). These reports are available at the following Web site: http://www.faa.gov /airports/ airport_ safety /wildlife/resources/. We also signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Bird Strike Committee USA and the National Association of State Aviation Officials (NASAO ). We continue to work with the NASAO wildl ife committee to educate states on wildlife hazards at general aviation airports and state aviation conferences. Strikes reported to the National Wildlife Strike Database have increased dramatically in 2011 as compared to previous years. In 2014, we plan to initiate a new study to help us determine whether the wildlife strike reporting rates are increasing at certificated and general aviation airports. The study will be conducted by Dr. Richard Dolbeer. I will keep the Board informed of the FAA's progress on this safety recommendation and provide an update by July 2014.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 5/27/2010
Response: On March 10, 2010, staff from the FAA and the NTSB met to discuss this recommendation in detail. An FAA-funded study, performed by Dr. Richard Dolbeer, evaluated whether the current level of strike reporting in the NWSD was sufficient for determining strike trends and developing national mitigation policy. The study concluded that the current level of reporting, which is higher than the level the NTSB found, is sufficient; therefore, the FAA does not plan to take the action recommended. However, based on Dr. Dolbeer’s recent study, the FAA plans to make improvements to reporting through an education/outreach program with a number of aviation organizations. This recommendation was based on the findings of an earlier study by Dr. Dolbeer; in his more recent study, Dr. Dolbeer evaluated whether the reporting problems identified in his earlier study continued to limit the applicability of the NWSD. The fact that Dr. Dolbeer himself concluded that current reporting rates are adequate is significant. The conduct of this study, in combination with the outreach/education program for targeted segments of the aviation community, constitutes an acceptable alternative response to this recommendation. Accordingly, pending improvements in wildlife strike reporting by the segments of the aviation community identified by the FAA, Safety Recommendation A-09-75 is classified OPEN -- ACCEPTABLE ALTERNATE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 12/23/2009
Response: Letter Mail Controlled 1/7/2010 3:59:43 PM MC# 2100009: - From J. Randolph Babbitt, Administrator: The FAA agrees with the benefit of increased reporting, and after the US Airways Flight 1549 incident that resulted in the emergency landing in the Hudson River, FAA initiated a review of its National Wildlife database. We improved the usability of the bird-strike Web site, made it more user friendly, and made it publically available. We also initiated a research study to determine the current level of strike reporting and whether that level of reporting was sufficient to determine strike trends and develop national policy. A study was conducted and we have enclosed a draft copy for your information. Dr. Richard Dolbeer found through the study, that strike reporting has increased significantly from his well publicized level of 20 percent, that had been documented in a few limited studies from the 1990s. His current analysis indicates that 39 percent of actual wildlife strikes are reoorted at part 139 airports. The data also verifies stabilization in reporting damaging strikes since 2000. We believe this important trend is a result of the increased data that is being used by biologists involved with more professionally run wildlife hazard programs at part 139 airports. Dr. Dolbeer also concludes that this level of strike reporting (39 percent) is sufficient to analyze national strike trends and develop national wildlife hazard mitigation policies. Which is one of the main purposes of having a national strike database. We believe the current level of reporting of 39 percent is statistically valid and sufficient to analyze strike trends and develop national mitigation policies. Accordingly, we do not believe it is necessary to impose mandatory strike reporting. Although the overall level of reporting is adequate, there are areas where improvements in strike reporting can be achieved (i.e., NIPIAS/ GA airports, part 139 airports, and air carriers). The FAA has initiated measures to increase strike reporting by: • Improved education/outreach with the National Associate of State Aviation Officials, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Airport Council International-North America, Air Transport Association of America, National Business Aviation Association, Inc., American Association of Airport Executives, air carriers, part 139 airports, and NPIAS/GA airports; and Expanding and improving procedures to transfer data from FAA and industry databases to the national database.