Safety Recommendation A-08-061
Details
Synopsis: On July 24, 2007, about 1405 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped de Havilland DHC-2 airplane, N995WA, operated by Taquan Air Service, was destroyed when it impacted mountainous terrain about 40 miles northeast of Ketchikan. The airline transport pilot and all four passengers were killed. The airplane was being operated under 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 as a visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand air tour flight. Instrument meteorological conditions were reported in the area at the time of the accident.
Recommendation: TO THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION: Develop, in cooperation with Southeast Alaska commercial air tour operators, aviation psychologists, and meteorologists, among others, a cue-based training program for commercial air tour pilots in Southeast Alaska that specifically addresses hazardous aspects of local weather phenomena and in-flight decision-making.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Closed - Acceptable Action
Mode: Aviation
Location: Ketchikan, AK, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: ANC07FA068
Accident Reports:
Report #: None
Accident Date: 7/24/2007
Issue Date: 7/31/2008
Date Closed: 3/28/2012
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Closed - Acceptable Action)
Keyword(s): Air Tours, Decision Making, Training and Education, Weather

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 3/28/2012
Response: The FAA stated that, in cooperation with local operators in Alaska, the Medallion Foundation, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, it has developed a cue-based weather-training program. Accordingly, Safety Recommendation A-08-61 is classified CLOSED—ACCEPTABLE ACTION.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 1/4/2012
Response: -From Michael P. Huerta, Acting Administrator: The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Juneau-based Flight Standards District Office, in cooperation with local operators in Southeast Alaska, the Medallion Foundation, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/Center for Disease Control, developed a cue-based weather-training program that was incorporated into air tour operator-specific training programs. As of the 2011 Alaska air tour season, all air tour operators in Southeast Alaska have added materials and concepts developed as part of the cue-based training project to their training programs. These include, but are not limited to, training videos, use of basic airplane training devices with wide screen outside view, and photo-realistic instrument panels for each type of tour airplane. These devices include programmable visibility restrictions and deterioration rates, visibility targets, and photo-realistic terrain. Ketchikan, Alaska-based air tour operators' cue-based training programs were approved and implemented prior to the 2010 air tour season. Prior to the 2011 air tour season, the Juneau, Alaska-based air tour operators' cue based training programs were approved and implemented. I believe that the FAA has effectively addressed this safety recommendation, and I consider our actions complete.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 11/4/2009
Response: The FAA stated that it continues to work with local operators in Alaska, the Medallion Foundation, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to develop a cue-based weather-training program that will be incorporated into operator-specific training programs. Pending completion of this cue-based training program, Safety Recommendation A-08-61 remains classified OPEN -- ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 6/11/2009
Response: The FAA stated that it is working with local operators in Alaska, the Medallion Foundation, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to develop a cue-based weather-training program that will be incorporated into operator-specific training programs. Pending completion of this cue-based training program, Safety Recommendation A-08-61 is classified OPEN -- ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 5/20/2009
Response: Letter Mail Controlled 5/29/2009 11:35:19 AM MC# 2090337: - From Lynne A. Osmus, Acting Administrator: FAA Comment. The FAA continues to work with local operators in Alaska, the Medallion Foundation, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and HealtWCenter for Disease Control and Prevention to develop a cue-based weather training video that is incorporated into operator specific training programs. The FAA will continue to monitor pilot training programs of air tour operators conducting air tours through the Misty Fjords National Monument and other scenic areas in Southeast Alaska until this video is developed. Pilots operating in visual flight rules (VFR) weather conditions need to recognize the onset of deteriorating weather conditions and have planned escape routes when necessary. The FAA will review the pilot training programs to ensure this training is included.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 10/27/2008
Response: Letter Mail Controlled 11/6/2008 12:15:33 PM MC# 2080674: - From Robert A. Sturgell, Acting Administrator: The FAA is currently working with local operators in Alaska, the Medallion Foundation, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/Center for Disease Control to develop a cue-based weather training program that will be incorporated into operator specific training programs. Until this video can be developed, the FAA will continue to monitor pilot training programs to ensure that adequate local weather training and inadvertent instrument meteorological conditions training and checking is included in the operators training program as required by the 14 CFR section 135.345, Pilots: Initial, transition, and upgrade ground training. The air tour operators that we will be monitoring are those conducting air tours throughout the Misty Fjords National Monument and other scenic areas in the Southeast Alaska area. Pilots operating in VFR weather conditions need to recognize the onset of deteriorating weather conditions and have planned escape routes when necessary. The FAA will review the pilot training programs to ensure such training is included.