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Aviation Accident

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NTSB Identification: CEN16FA122
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, March 11, 2016 in EspaƱola, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/23/2018
Aircraft: REMOS ACFT GMBH FLUGZEUGBAU REMOS GX, registration: N28GX
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting a personal flight in the airport traffic pattern. A witness reported seeing the single-engine airplane enter left traffic for runway 16 and land. The airplane then made a second takeoff and continued to make left turns. The witness reported that, while airplane was turning from the crosswind leg to the downwind leg, he heard a reduction in engine power and saw the airplane descend toward the ground. Another witness reported that he heard the airplane takeoff from the airport and then saw the airplane make a left turn. He stated that, while the airplane was in the left turn, it pitched nose-down and descended toward the ground. The witness also noted that the airplane's engine sounded normal during the flight.

A postaccident examination established that the airplane had impacted the ground in a nose-low attitude and was destroyed by impact and postimpact fire damage. The examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane during the flight. Based on the witness descriptions and the impact geometry, it is likely that the pilot did not maintain adequate airspeed during the left turn, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude.


The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
  • The pilot's failure to maintain adequate airspeed while operating in the airport traffic pattern, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude.