Crash of Asiana Flight 214, San Francisco, CA, 7/6/2013

Technical Panel Biographies

Tim LeBaron
Hearing Officer

Mr. LeBaron is the deputy investigator-in-charge (IIC) and the hearing officer for the Asiana flight 214 accident investigation. He has been with the NTSB since 2003 and is currently in the Major Investigations Division of the Office of Aviation Safety. Prior to joining the Major Investigations Division, Mr. LeBaron served as the IIC for more than 300 general aviation accidents. More recently, he has been the US Accredited Representative for several high-profile accidents around the world, including the recent Boeing 747 cargo flight accident in Bagram, Afghanistan. He holds an airframe and powerplant certificate with an inspection authorization and a commercial pilot certificate with instrument ratings for single- and multi-engine land and single-engine sea airplanes. Mr. LeBaron holds a master of aeronautical science degree in aviation/aerospace safety from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, a bachelor of science degree in aeronautical technology from Purdue University, and an associate of science degree in aviation maintenance technology from Vincennes University. He remains active in general aviation flying his 1945 Piper Cub.

Bill English
Investigator in Charge

Mr. English is the investigator-in-charge (IIC) for the Asiana flight 214 accident investigation. He began working at the NTSB in 1999 in the Operation Factors Division of the Office of Aviation Safety and has been in the Major Investigations Division since 2004. Mr. English has been the IIC on numerous major aviation accidents in the US, including the crashes of Continental Airlines flight 1404 in Denver, Southwest flight 1919 in Chicago, and a US Navy-contracted Boeing 707. He has served as the US Accredited Representative on investigations in China, Indonesia, Spain, Korea, England, Brazil (on the Boeing 737/Embraer Legacy midair collision), , as well as many others. Recently he served in this role for two large cargo airplane accidents in Saudi Arabia and Dubai. Additionally, Mr. English serves as the NTSB's resource for unmanned aircraft investigations. He previously worked for the Federal Aviation Administration for 13 years as an air traffic controller and quality assurance specialist and helped develop GPS navigation procedures. He is a certified instrument flight instructor and commercial pilot in single- and multi-engine airplanes. He has flown aerial observation, corporate, and electronics test aircraft and has extensive experience in flight inspection and advanced navigation technology. Prior to joining the NTSB, he was a contributing editor to IFR Magazine. Mr. English graduated from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University with a bachelor of science degree in aeronautical science, and he has done graduate work in geospatial intelligence at Penn State.

Jeong-kwen Park
KARAIB Accredited Representative

Mr. Park is the Accredited Representative for the Republic of Korea on the Asiana flight 214 accident investigation. He is a Director of the Aviation Investigation Team and has been with the Aviation and Railway Accident Investigation Board (ARAIB) since 2012. He previously worked for the Civil Aviation Authority of Korea for 17 years as an air traffic controller, aeronautical service manager, and airport safety inspector. He also worked on the development of future GPS navigation system for small aircraft. Mr. Park graduated from Korea Aerospace University with a bachelor of science degree in air traffic management, and an MBA in international airport management.

Roger Cox
Operations

Captain Cox is a senior air safety investigator and has been with NTSB's Operational Factors Division since 2006. He has served as the operational factors group chairman on the American Airlines incident in Jackson Hole, Wyoming; the Colgan Airlines accident in Buffalo, New York; the East Coast Jets accident in Owatonna, Minnesota; and the Cessna Citation accident in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He has assisted on international accidents, including the Lufthansa Cargo accident in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; the Caribbean Air Lines accident in Georgetown, Guyana; the USA Jets DC-9 accident in Saltillo, Mexico; and the Excelaire-Gol Airlines midair collision in Brazil. He is a former airline pilot with 18,000 flight hours in worldwide operations and is type rated on the Boeing 757, Boeing 737 and Airbus 320. He was a US Air Force flight Examiner in the C-141, and also flew the Boeing 727, Boeing 707, Northrop F 20, and Beechcraft King Air 100 airplanes. He served as a safety chairman and master executive council chairman with the Air Line Pilots Association. He is a graduate of Stanford University and earned an MBA at Southern Illinois University.

William Bramble Ph.D
Human Performance

Dr. Bramble is a senior human performance investigator at the NTSB. Since 2002, he has supported the investigation of many domestic and foreign aircraft accidents and incidents, including those involving Air Midwest Flight 5481 (2003), Flash Airlines Flight 604 (2004), Comair Flight 5191 (2007), Kenya Airways Flight 507 (2007), Aeroflot Nord Flight 821 (2008), Continental Airlines Flight 1404 (2008), FedEx Flight 80 (2009), Aires Flight 8250 (2010), and an experimental Gulfstream G650 (2011). Previously, Dr. Bramble was an NTSB transportation research analyst (1999-2002). Before that, he worked as a human factors consultant and instructional technologist for Flight Safety International, assisting with the development of instructional courseware and instructional facilities and performing research on airline pilot pre-employment screening and job performance measures. Dr. Bramble holds a B.S. in psychology and a Ph.D. in human factors psychology from the University of Central Florida. He also holds a private pilot certificate.

Pete Wentz
Survival Factors

Mr. Wentz is a survival factors investigator in the Office of Aviation Safety and has been with the NTSB since November 2012. He is a group member on the survival factors group for the Asiana flight 214 accident investigation. He previously worked for the Federal Aviation Administration as an air safety inspector and for American Airlines in cabin safety. Mr. Wentz graduated from Huron College.

Emily Gibson
Survival Factors

Ms. Emily Gibson has been a survival factors investigator with the NTSB since 2012. She is a group member on the Asiana flight 214 accident investigation as well as the UPS accident in Birmingham, Alabama. Previously, Ms. Gibson was an aviation safety inspector for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), specializing in cabin safety. Prior to the FAA, Ms. Gibson worked at two major airlines in roles focusing on cabin safety, the training of flight attendants, and the development of in-flight policies and procedures.

John DeLisi
Director, Office of Aviation Safety

Mr. DeLisi has been with the NTSB since 1992 and was appointed the Director of the Office of Aviation Safety in 2012. He began his career with the NTSB as an aircraft systems engineer in the Aviation Engineering Division. He was an on-scene investigator for 20 major airline accidents and 6 international investigations. Mr. DeLisi has also served as the chief of the Aviation Engineering Division and the chief of the Major Investigations Division where managed over a dozen major airline accident investigations, including the investigation of the Comair accident in Lexington, Kentucky. Later, as deputy director of the Office of Aviation Safety, he oversaw the investigations of the ditching of US Airways flight 1549 on the Hudson River and the Colgan Air accident in Clarence Center, New York.

Mr. DeLisi has presented technical papers at conferences sponsored by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Flight Safety Foundation, and the International Aviation Safety Association and has been the Sigma Series Lecturer at the NASA Langley Research Center. He is a recipient of the NTSB's Managing Director's Award, which recognizes an outstanding achievement that contributed to or enhanced the management, leadership, or administration of the NTSB's mission, and has been nominated twice for the NTSB's Dr. John K. Lauber Science & Engineering Award for technical excellence in accident investigation.

Mr. DeLisi is a cum laude graduate of the University of Michigan with a degree in aerospace engineering and has done graduate work in engineering management at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He also holds a private pilot certificate and has multiengine, instrument, and aerobatic flight experience. Prior to joining the NTSB, Mr. DeLisi spent 10 years as a flight test engineer with McDonnell Douglas, where he was involved in flight test programs on the F-15 and F/A-18 aircraft.