General Aviation Safety: Climbing to the Next Level

Biographies

 

NTSB technical panel staff:

Jill Demko is an air safety investigator in the Office of Aviation Safety, Eastern Region. She has been with the NTSB since 1999 and has served as the investigator-in-charge IIC of numerous accidents involving air carrier, air taxi and general aviation aircraft. She has served as the IIC of several high-profile accidents, as well as the operations group chairman of the September 2008 Maryland State Police accident in District Heights, MD. In addition, Ms. Demko has been appointed as the U.S. Accredited Representative for numerous international investigations, including an MD-82 accident in Phuket, Thailand. Ms. Demko is a certified flight instructor and commercial pilot. She is also a certified dispatcher. Ms. Demko earned a Bachelors of Science in Aviation Management with Flight from Florida Institute of Technology, and a Masters of Aeronautical Science with specializations in operations and safety from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Prior to coming to the NTSB, she worked in various flight operations positions at a regional airline. Ms. Demko also teaches courses in Accident Investigation and Systems Safety, as an Adjunct Professor for Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

Darrin Broadwater serves as a Senior Aviation Accident Analyst in the Office of Aviation Safety, where he reviews accident investigation reports and petitions for reconsideration. Additionally, he was the Hearing Officer for the NTSB's investigation into the January 27, 2009, accident involving a Fed-Ex owned ATR-42 that crashed 300 feet short of the threshold while on approach to Lubbock International Airport in Lubbock, Texas. Prior to being an analyst, Mr. Broadwater worked for the Office of Safety Recommendations, where he administered the NTSB's database of safety recommendations. In that capacity, he oversaw the development and deployment of a public web interface for the recommendations database and served as a lead for the 2007 ICAO audit of the Board's Annex 13 compliance. Mr. Broadwater joined the NTSB in 2002 in the Office of Aviation Safety's Writing and Editing Division. Mr. Broadwater holds an M.A. from St. John's College in Annapolis and a B.S. in English Literature from Frostburg State University. He is also currently finishing up his private pilot certification and has participated in numerous training courses pertaining to aircraft accident investigation, human fatigue factors, and related subjects.

Jeff Marcus has been with the NTSB since 1999 where he is involved in evaluating responses to aviation Safety Recommendations and advocating for their implementation. Prior to the NTSB, Mr. Marcus was with the Federal Aviation Administration's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City for 7 years where he was the Acting Manager of the Aeromedical Research Division, and the Manager of the Protection and Survival Laboratory. Before his experience at CAMI, he worked for 12 years for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration where he ran the head injury research program, and he performed research evaluating crash dummy design and interpreting impact signals in terms of injury potential. Mr. Marcus holds an MS in Mechanical Engineering from Michigan State University, and a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the author or co-author of over 30 technical papers on biomechanics, transportation safety, and computer modeling. Mr. Marcus is also an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Computer Management and Information Sciences department of the University of Maryland, University College.

Andy Olvis is a Transportation Specialist in the NTSB's Office of Aviation Safety, Operational Factors Division, Air Traffic Control. He has been with the NTSB since 2011, and has served as the Investigator-in-Charge of numerous air traffic control incident investigations, and as ATC Workgroup Chairman for regional aircraft accident investigations. Mr. Olvis has been qualified in multiple Center Radar Approach Control facilities, Terminal Radar Approach Control facilities, and Air Traffic Control Towers throughout the United States Marine Corps. He has approximately 1100 hours as a Marine Corps Transport Aircrewman on BE-200 Kingair aircraft. Mr. Olvis obtained a Bachelors of Science in Professional Aeronautics from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and a Masters of Aeronautical Science with dual specializations in Aerospace Operations and Aerospace Management from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Prior to coming to the NTSB, he worked as an Assistant Department Chair for Aviation and as a lecturer at Texas State Technical College, a Part 141 Aviation school. Mr. Olvis managed the ATC-Collegiate Training Initiative program as well as taught aviation courses to pilots, air traffic controllers, and dispatchers.

Cathy Gagne has worked at the NTSB since 2001. Currently, she is a senior technical writer/editor in the Office of Aviation Safety, where she has written several major accident investigation reports that involved general aviation (GA) aircraft and resulted in dozens of recommendations. Previously, she worked as an air safety investigator in the NTSB's regional office in Atlanta, where she served as the investigator-in-charge for numerous GA accidents. She holds a Master of Aeronautical Science with distinction from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida. Her thesis research in 2001 used NASA's Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments' prototype glass cockpit displays to examine potential human performance safety issues before glass displays were available in type-certificated GA aircraft. She holds a commercial pilot certificate and owns and enjoys flying a vintage Beechcraft Bonanza.

Paul Suffern is a senior meteorologist investigator for the NTSB. He has been with the NTSB since January 2011 serving in the Office of Aviation Safety. He has served as a meteorologist investigator in more than 50 accidents, including Caribbean Airlines flight 523 in Guyana; Southwest Airlines flight 1919 in Chicago; and United Airlines flight 273 in Missouri. Before joining the NTSB, Mr. Suffern worked as a forecaster for the National Weather Service in Alaska, where he earned the NOAA Isaac Cline Award. While weather forecasting in Alaska Mr. Suffern would provide weather briefings for pilots and forecast weather conditions for flights ranging from general aviation to commercial carriers. Mr. Suffern holds a M.S. in atmospheric science and a B.S. in meteorology from North Carolina State University.

Dennis Diaz is an air safety investigator in the NTSB's Office of Aviation Safety, Eastern Region. He has been with the NTSB since 2003, and has served as the investigator-in-charge and group chairman of numerous aircraft accident investigations. Mr. Diaz is a commercial pilot and a current certificated flight instructor. Mr. Diaz obtained a Bachelors of Science in Aviation Management from Southern Illinois University, and a Masters of Aeronautical Science with a specialization in aviation safety from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Prior to coming to the NTSB, he worked in ground support for several fixed based operators and in flight instruction. Mr. Diaz is an active pilot and is in the process of building an experimental airplane.

Van McKenny is an Aerospace Engineer in the Office of Aviation Safety, Western Pacific Region. He has been employed with the NTSB since 2003, and has worked as the Investigator-in-Charge for over 315 safety investigations. He has served as the Group Chairman for numerous operations, airworthiness, and systems groups involved in major investigations. Mr. McKenny holds an Airline Transport Pilot certificate and commercial helicopter pilot certificate. His aviation experience includes heavy helicopter operations, military flight instruction, International Space Station operations, spacecraft extravehicular activity (EVA) operations, and aircraft threat weapons forensic analysis. Currently, he serves as Commander in the US Navy Reserve, is a certified Program Manager in the Naval Air Systems Command acquisition community, and is a designated Naval Aviator. He obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from Washington State University.

Doug Brazy is an investigator in the NTSB's Office of Research and Engineering, Vehicle Recorder Division. He has been with the NTSB since 1992, and holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and a private pilot's license. Mr. Brazy is currently a Cockpit Voice Recorder Specialist and has served as a group chairman or specialist on numerous investigations in all of the NTSB investigative modal offices.

Dr. Loren. Groff is a National Resource Specialist, Safety Data Systems and Analysis in the NTSB Office of Research and Engineering. Since joining the NTSB in 2002, he has had extensive experience in aviation safety data analysis, and regularly represents the NTSB and United States in international aviation industry and government initiatives and working groups involving aviation safety analysis. He has participated in numerous accident investigations and has managed or co-managed several NTSB safety studies of general aviation safety issues, including weather-related general aviation accidents, the introduction of glass cockpit avionics into light aircraft, and most recently, the safety of experimental amateur-built aircraft. Prior to joining the Safety Board, held aviation positions ranging from flight instructor to airline pilot. Dr. Groff received his M.A. and Ph.D. at Wichita State University in human factors psychology.

Safety Priorities panelists:

Linda Connell, the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) Program Director, is a Research Psychologist in the Human Systems Integration Division at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA. She has been working at NASA Ames Research Center since 1981 and has participated in numerous studies with domestic and international research teams to explore human factors issues in aviation and other industries in which her skills as Private Pilot and Registered Nurse have been invaluable. During her graduate work at San Jose State University, she completed her Master's degree in experimental psychology with her thesis on physiological countermeasures to jet lag. In 1997, she was appointed as the Director of ASRS. During these 15 years, she has managed a nearly 100% increase in report intake and the modernization of the ASRS. Ms Connell has completed coursework from USC in Aviation Accident Investigation and Legal Aspects of Aviation Safety. Additionally, Ms Connell has received numerous NASA and industry recognition and awards including: appointment as honorary member of the Guild of Spanish Pilots; recognition from Mexican Pilot's Association, Honor and Justice Commission for participation in ASPA/ICAO Regional Seminar on Safety Reporting Threat and Error Management (TEM) and Cabin Safety; "Partners in Safety" Award from Alaska Air Carriers Association; and SEPLA (Spanish Air Line Pilots Association) Award for contributions to the development of the Spanish Reporting System (SRS). Ms. Connell also consults on the application of the ASRS confidential reporting model to numerous organizations, including: Int'l Confidential Aviation Safety Systems (group of 12 international aviation reporting systems); Institute of Medicine, Development of Patient Safety Data Standards, Member-Liaison Panel; Advisory Board Member, Int'l Fire Chiefs Association, National Fire Fighter Near-Miss Reporting System; and currently NASA Program Director for FRA/NASA Confidential Close-Call Reporting System for the U.S. Railroad Industry.

Tony Fazio is a 30 year employee of the Federal Aviation Administration where he has served in a number of management, policy and international positions. He assumed his duties as the Director, Accident Investigation in August, 2009. In 2010 he managed the consolidation of the office with the Office of Data Analysis to form the Office of Accident Investigation and Prevention. This office was established to better position the FAA to meet its safety management responsibilities. Included in these responsibilities are the management of the Aviation Safety Information, Analysis and Sharing program (ASIAS), the Commercial Aviation Safety Team and the General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GA-JSC). Mr. Fazio is the industry co-chair of the GA-JSC. His previous executive positions include Director of the FAA's Europe, Africa and Middle East office in Brussels, Belgium and Director of Rulemaking. He holds a Masters of Public Policy from the University of Maryland.

Mel Cintron, Manager of the FAA's General Aviation and Commercial Division (AFS-800), has 30 years of experience in the aviation industry, including serving as a Director of Maintenance for a Part 135 operator, a Chief Maintenance Inspector, and an on-call helicopter pilot for a CRS 145/135/141 helicopter organization. He holds the following certificates: Private Pilot-Airplane, Commercial Pilot-Helicopter, and A&P Mechanic with Inspection Authorization. Cintron holds Bachelor and Master degrees in Business Administration, served as a U.S. Army combat/flight medic in the Gulf War, and was awarded the Bronze Star as an Aviation Maintenance Officer while on a 12-month tour of duty in Iraq. Cintron joined the FAA in 1995.

Safety Programs panelists:

Thomas P. Turner directs the education and safety arm of the 9,000-member American Bonanza Society Air Safety Foundation. He holds an ATP certificate with instructor, CFII and MEI ratings. He has over 3,800 hours of flight time logged, including more than 2,400 hours as an instructor. He has previously been a Lead Instructor for FlightSafety International's Bonanza pilot training program at the Beechcraft factory; production test pilot for engine modifications; aviation insurance underwriter; corporate pilot and safety expert; Captain in the United States Air Force; and a contract course developer for Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He holds a Masters Degree in Aviation Safety. His many awards include the 2010 National FAA Safety Team Representative of the Year and 2008 FAA Central Region CFI of the Year.

Jonathan "JJ" Greenway is president of Avemco Insurance Company. He has flown over 14,000 hours since his teens. He was a corporate pilot in the South Pacific before becoming a Captain and Check Airman on the Boeing 767 for American Airlines. Later, he served as Safety Director of the AOPA Air Safety Institute. An active CFI for over 30 years, JJ still shares his passion for aviation by flying and instructing in his Bellanca Decathlon.

Paul Deres is the Director of Education for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) Foundation's Air Safety Institute (ASI, formerly the Air Safety Foundation) based in Frederick, Maryland. Paul manages ASI's content development and accident analysis teams, and oversees the implementation and development of educational programs including award-winning online courses, live seminars, videos, safety quizzes and more. He also represents ASI at various industry and government meetings, most recently as co-chair of the FAA/Industry Runway Safety Council. Paul is a certificated flight instructor and holds both A&P mechanic certificates, and he holds a B.S. in Missionary Aviation from Piedmont Bible College. He is currently taking graduate classes in Business Administration from the University of Notre Dame.

James Oliphant is an Account Manager II with the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Insurance Agency (AOPAIA), located in Wichita, Kansas. In this position he manages sales, development and administration of new and existing aviation insurance business. Mr. Oliphant joined AOPAIA in 2003 as a licensed Kansas Property and Casualty Insurance account manager. In addition, he teaches the Private Pilot ground school to other staff members at AOPAIA in Wichita. He is an Advanced Ground Instructor, Commercial Instrument rated pilot who is in a partnership in owning a 1986 Mooney 201. His flying activities include Executive Board member for the Mooney Caravan to Oshkosh Safety and Education Foundation and Young Eagle flights. Mr. Oliphant is a graduate of Wichita State University with a Bachelor and Masters of Music Education Degrees. Outside of flying, he directs the Wichita Community Concert Band and performs with several professional and amateur groups in Wichita.

Michael L. Costa is the Manager of the National FAA Safety Team. He is a Summa Cum Laude graduate of Ashford University with a BA in Social and Criminal Justice. He holds type ratings in B-777, B-757/767, CL-65, EMB-120, SF-340, CE-500, BE-1900, BA-3100 aircraft. He has been an FAA Operations Inspector in the Atlanta and Memphis field offices, where he has provided oversight of a Part 142 Training Center; several Part 121 airlines, and as the Southern Region Technical Branch/general aviation and air carrier. He served as a Captain on SF-340 and CL-65 aircraft for Pinnacle Airlines before joining the FAA in 2003. His interest in aviation extends back to graduating from an Aviation High School, and having been a member of a flying club since age 14. He has served as a flight instructor at a school in located in Tennessee, and at a busy Part 61 flight school at the Farmingdale, New York airport.

Role of the Flight Instructor panelists:

Doug Stewart is the Executive Director of the Society of Aviation and Flight Educators. He is a seven time Master CFI, a DPE, and in 2004 was the National Flight Instructor of the Year. Mr. Stewart is a full time flight instructor, specializing in instrument training, tailwheel training, and technically advanced aircraft. He has trained pilots in everything from a J-3 Cub to a Pilatus PC-12. Mr. Stewart has logged over 13,400 hours flying, with more than 10,500 hours of "dual given". His articles have appeared in "Vintage Airplane," the FAA Aviation News, Mentor, e-Mentor, Flight Training Magazine and the ASF Instructor Report. He's also a contributor to Pilotworkshops.com where his presentations on single-pilot IFR are a headline feature. Stating that you have not begun to learn until you start teaching, his education is ongoing as he learns from virtually every client he works with.

Jason Blair is the Executive Director of the National Association of Flight Instructors (NAFI). He is a NAFI Master Flight Instructor and a FAA Designated Pilot Examiner for both part 61 and part 141 training providers, and is an active CFI with over 2000 hours of instruction given. He actively represents NAFI and the flight instruction community in a number of capacities including on the FAA's Runway Safety Council, the General Aviation Joint Steering Committee, the TSA Aviation Safety Advisory Council, NATA's Flight Training Committee, and others. Mr. Blair has undergraduate degrees in Human Resource Management and in International and Comparative Politics, and a Master's Degree in Development Administration from Western Michigan University. He flies general aviation aircraft for much of his personal and business travel.

James Viola is the FAA Branch Manager of the Airman Certification and Training, a branch of the General Aviation and Commercial Division, Flight Standards, AFS-810. He is responsible for flight training, general aviation management systems, and flight training standards. Mr. Viola oversees the technical guidance, policies, standards, and approvals for Aviation Training Device (ATD) levels 1 through 3, and Advanced Aviation Training Devices (AATDs) as well as new and emerging advanced technology digital simulation devices used in general aviation in both parts 61 and 141 pilot schools. In his personal time, Mr. Viola is also the Program Director for the International Helicopter Safety Team and the Director of the Pilot Familiarization Program for The International Grumman American Pilots Association, as well as the working group Chairman for General Aviation of the International Society of Air safety Investigators. He holds Airline Transport and Flight Instructor Certificates for airplanes and helicopters; and is qualified in a variety of helicopters including the Robinson R-22, R-44: the Hughes 269/300, the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk; the Bell UH-1 Huey, OH-58 Jet Ranger, and AH-1 Cobra; the McDonald Douglas 500 series; and the Boeing MH-47 Chinook. Mr. Viola has also flown more than 30 single and multi-engine airplanes. He holds a Master of Science in International Relations from Auburn University, Montgomery Al. Prior to his current position, Mr. Viola was a General Aviation Safety Inspector at the DC FSDO for both airplanes and helicopters. He was responsible for Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations Parts 61, 91, 133, 135, and 137. He administered CFI practical flight tests to both airplane and helicopter flight instructor candidates, was a National Resource Inspector for Robinson Helicopters, and attended the FAA Night Vision Course adding the FAA qualification to his 1000+ hours of Military Night Vision Goggle experience.

Dr. Elizabeth Bjerke is an Associate Professor of Aviation at the University of North Dakota, and serves as the Associate Chair for the Department of Aviation. Her teaching responsibilities include being the Course Prime for the CFI Initial Certification course at UND, which is a required 5-credit, 400 level academic and flight course required for all professional flight majors. Dr. Bjerke has taught this course 28 times over the last 10 years and estimates that she has had over 800 aspiring CFIs pass through her classroom. She also holds a Commercial Pilot Certificate with Airplane Single-Engine Land and Sea, Multi-Engine Land ratings, as well as a Certified Flight Instructor Certificate with Airplane Single and Multi-Engine, Instrument Airplane ratings. Dr. Bjerke has a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership, and focuses her research efforts on aviation education specifically student persistence and success. Over the past five years, she has published over a half a dozen research journal articles and given numerous presentations on various aviation education related topics. Dr. Bjerke is actively involved with the Aviation Accreditation Board International (AABI), where she has served on the Board of Trustees since 2007. She is also a member of the University Aviation Association (UAA), and FAASTeam Lead Representative for the North Dakota Region. Prior to her current role on faculty, Dr. Bjerke served as a Lead Flight Instructor and an Assistant Chief-Flight Instructor for UND's Part 141 flight training program.

Robert Barnes is President of the International Association of Flight Training Professionals, an organization dedicated to the identification, recognition, and timely communication of demonstrable global pilot training best practices. Mr. Barnes holds a Bachelor's Degree in Aerospace Engineering from California State Polytechnic University and a Master's Degree in Education from Phillips University (OK); and a Certificate in Aviation Safety from the University of Southern California with specialized course work in systems safety engineering, aviation human factors, aircraft accident investigation, accident/incident preparedness, and crew resource management training. Mr. Barnes is a former USAF instructor pilot and flight safety officer. He holds a Certificate of Master Instructor in USAF Flight Training (T38), and a USAF Well-Done for Outstanding Airmanship during an aircraft emergency. He has lectured at both the USAF and National Test Pilot Schools on aircraft certification human factors, and has spoken before the Royal Aeronautical Society on various aviation safety topics. Mr. Barnes has been involved with aviation safety and pilot training for more than 40 years and is frequently involved in the human factors aspects of aircraft certification.

Content, Quality, and Consistency of Pilot Training panelists:

James Viola is the FAA Branch Manager of the Airman Certification and Training, a branch of the General Aviation and Commercial Division, Flight Standards, AFS-810. He is responsible for flight training, general aviation management systems, and flight training standards. Mr. Viola oversees the technical guidance, policies, standards, and approvals for Aviation Training Device (ATD) levels 1 through 3, and Advanced Aviation Training Devices (AATDs) as well as new and emerging advanced technology digital simulation devices used in general aviation in both parts 61 and 141 pilot schools. In his personal time, Mr. Viola is also the Program Director for the International Helicopter Safety Team and the Director of the Pilot Familiarization Program for The International Grumman American Pilots Association, as well as the working group Chairman for General Aviation of the International Society of Air safety Investigators. He holds Airline Transport and Flight Instructor Certificates for airplanes and helicopters; and is qualified in a variety of helicopters including the Robinson R-22, R-44: the Hughes 269/300, the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk; the Bell UH-1 Huey, OH-58 Jet Ranger, and AH-1 Cobra; the McDonald Douglas 500 series; and the Boeing MH-47 Chinook. Mr. Viola has also flown more than 30 single and multi-engine airplanes. He holds a Master of Science in International Relations from Auburn University, Montgomery Al. Prior to his current position, Mr. Viola was a General Aviation Safety Inspector at the DC FSDO for both airplanes and helicopters. He was responsible for Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations Parts 61, 91, 133, 135, and 137. He administered CFI practical flight tests to both airplane and helicopter flight instructor candidates, was a National Resource Inspector for Robinson Helicopters, and attended the FAA Night Vision Course adding the FAA qualification to his 1000+ hours of Military Night Vision Goggle experience.

Jackie Spanitz is the Director of Curriculum Development for Aviation Supplies & Academics (ASA). ASA produces more than 400 products ranging from textbooks and pilot supplies to software and eBooks for pilots, instructors, flight engineers, air traffic controllers, flight attendants, and aviation technicians. Ms. Spanitz is responsible for new and existing product development, integrating these products into new and existing curricula. She works with authors, subject matter experts, and government officials worldwide, providing research, development, and project management. Ms. Spanitz holds Instructor and Commercial Pilot certificates, a Bachelor of Science in aviation technology from Western Michigan University and a Masters in Aeronautical Science from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. She is the author of Guide to the Flight Review, is the technical editor for ASA's Test Prep series, and has written for numerous aviation publications. Ms. Spanitz most recently participated on the Airman Testing Standards and Training Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) to the Federal Aviation Administration, recommending enhancements to the airman knowledge test content and its processes and methodologies for training and testing.

Todd Willinger is CEO and co-founder of Redbird Flight Simulations, Inc. in Austin, TX. Redbird was established in 2006 with the specific purpose of making simulation more accessible to the general aviation industry. Since its inception, Redbird has delivered innovative, high-quality training devices to more than 750 flight schools, colleges, universities and individual pilots around the world. Prior to Redbird, Mr. Willinger held executive technology roles at PepsiCo, Dell and ServiceMaster. Mr. Willinger holds a BS in Computer Science from Fort Hays State University.

Robert A. Wright is President and CEO of Wright Aviation Solutions LLC. Mr. Wright formed his company in early 2005 to provide specialized and tailored solutions for complex aviation safety, training, and regulatory problems faced by aviation manufacturers, training entities, operators of technically advanced aircraft, and other clients. His practice also focuses on integration of advanced technology general aviation aircraft into an evolving National Airspace System. Mr. Wright holds an FAA Airline Transport Pilot Certificate with four jet type ratings and has more than 9400 flight hours. Prior to forming Wright Aviation Solutions, Mr. Wright had a distinguished 22 year career with the FAA, retiring in April 2005 as the chief FAA executive for general aviation flight standards. He also served as the chief FAA executive for developing new flight technologies and procedures and held a variety of other field and headquarters positions in the Flight Standards Service and in the FAA research and development organization.

Mr. Kenneth Byrnes is an Associate Professor of Aeronautical Science as well as the Chairman of the Flight Training Department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. In his current role as Chairman of the Flight Department, Mr. Byrnes is responsible for leading over 1000 flight students, over 130 Certified Flight Instructors, 25 A&P mechanics, and 15 additional support staff members. His academic teaching responsibilities include Instructional Design in Aviation, Aviation Legislation, Private Knowledge, and Commercial Knowledge courses. He holds a Bachelors Degree in Aeronautical Science, a Masters Degree in Business Administration in Aviation, and a Six Sigma Green Belt. He is currently completing a PhD in Business with a dual specialization in Airline Management and Management of Engineering and Technology. His dissertation research investigates the relationship between organizational safety culture and pilot decision making in emergency scenarios. Mr. Byrnes has significant experience as a Certified Flight Instructor and holds a Commercial Pilot Certificate with Airplane Single-Engine Land, Multi Engine Land, and Instrument Ratings. He has over 10 years experience managing Part 141 and 142 flight training organizations having held positions as an Assistant Training Manager, Flight Training Manager, 141 Check Airman, 142 Training Center Evaluator, Chief of Flight Production, and Assistant Chief Flight Instructor.

Weather-Related Decision Making panelists:

David A. Strahle, M.D., CFI-AI is an avid pilot with a commercial license, instrument rating, basic, advanced and instrument ground instructor's license, flight instructor's license, and instrument flight instructor's license. His ratings include multi-engine and sea plane as well as a a Bachelor's Degree is Aerospace Technology. In 1969 he wrote a research paper describing the far reaching benefits of transmitting weather to airborne aircraft including the initial steps of implementation. Throughout the past 43 years, Dr. Strahle has continued to privately support and nurture the datalink programs including nationwide presentations to pilots on the proper in-flight interpretation of datalink NEXRAD radar images.

John Lanicci, Ph. D., is a Professor of Applied Meteorology and the Coordinator of the M.S. in Aeronautics program at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, in Daytona Beach, Florida. He joined the Embry-Riddle faculty in 2006 after completing a 27-year career in the U.S. Air Force. Among his military assignments were two staff tours at the Pentagon; two tours as a weather forecaster and chief of model development at A.F. Global Weather Central (now the A.F. Weather Agency), Offutt AFB, Nebraska; an assignment as a research scientist and project manager at the A.F. Research Laboratory at Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts; a member of the faculty of the Air War College at Maxwell AFB, Alabama; a detachment commander at Shemya AFB, Alaska; and a squadron commander at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. His last duty assignment prior to retirement was Commander of the Air Force Weather Agency, where he was responsible for a 1,100-person weather center with 14 worldwide operating locations providing weather support to the Department of Defense and the national intelligence community, and oversaw weather technology development and acquisition programs worth $850M. Dr. Lanicci received a B.S. degree (summa cum laude) in physics from Manhattan College, Bronx, New York, in 1979; a B.S. degree (with highest distinction) in meteorology from Penn State University in 1980, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Meteorology from Penn State in 1984 and 1991 under Air Force Institute of Technology sponsorship. Dr. Lanicci teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in synoptic and mesoscale meteorology, weather analysis and forecasting, aviation meteorology, and environmental security. His research interests include the integration of weather information into aviation decision-making, central Florida severe storms, and the potential effects of climate change on national and international security. Dr. Lanicci is a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. He is the Chair of the AMS Committee on Environmental Security, a member of the AMS Board on Higher Education, and has been the national faculty co-chair of the annual AMS Student Conference since 2008.

Ian M. Johnson is an Engineering Psychologist with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Weather Research Branch of the Aviation Weather Division. He currently serves as the Human Factors Lead on the NextGen Weather Technology in the Cockpit (WTIC) program. He has over 15 years' experience in Human Factors Engineering/System Safety of various cockpit display systems and user interfaces. Experience ranges from lead Human Factors Engineer, technical contributor, Staff Human Factors Engineer of Presidential Helicopter program to Project Manager Aviation Analyst Human Factors Specialist. He is a contributing member of RTCA 206 and SAE G-10 weather information systems group. Ian holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Factors Psychology, a Masters of Aeronautical Science in Human Factors in Aviation Systems and a Masters of Aeronautical Science in Aviation/Aerospace Safety Systems from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. He also holds a Private Pilot Certificate for Single and Multi-Engine Airplane.

Bob Dreisewerd has been the Executive Vice President and Chief Development Officer for Baron Services, Inc. since 2010 where he is responsible for all of the ongoing research and development, operations, service, and support for all 5 Baron Companies. From 2007 to 2010 he was Baron's Senior Vice President of R&D, Forecast and Customer Services for Baron Services, Inc. where he was responsible for directing and coordinating research and development of new and innovative weather data products and software solutions for Baron Services, Inc., WxWorx, and Baron Mobile; ensuring the integrity of the weather data and forecast products delivered to customers; and leading initiatives which promote growth and improvement within the 24/7 customer support division. He started with Baron in 2006 as the Vice President of Forecast and Customer Services where he was responsible for the planning and development of Baron's new 24/7 Weather Operations Center and leading the customer support and forecast services teams. Prior to joining Baron, he spent 15 years working directly in the field of road weather in various positions ranging from Staff Forecaster to Director of Operations for Surface Systems Inc. and Quixote Corporation. Bob is a 1991 graduate of the University of Missouri with a degree in Atmospheric Science.

William Knecht, Ph. D., is an Engineering Research Psychologist and Principal Investigator working for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) at the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute in Oklahoma City. His academic major was experimental psychology with a minor in computer science. He joined the FAA in 2001, and primarily investigates weather-related general aviation issues.

Steve Abelman manages the Aviation Weather Research Team within the FAA's Aviation Weather Division. Aviation Weather Research Team sponsored activities include the Aviation Weather Research Program (AWRP) and the Weather Technology in the Cockpit (WTIC) portfolio. Steve is also coordinating efforts to improve and streamline the process for transition of weather research to operations and is leading FAA efforts on a multi-agency initiative to coordinate and consolidate weather research initiatives for NextGen. Prior to his transition to the FAA in February of 2011, Steve was the "contents" lead for National Weather Service (NWS) efforts to populate the 4-D Weather Data Cube. Steve was the NWS lead for development of the 4-D Weather Functional Requirements for NextGen Air Traffic Management and lead outreach activities to promote NextGen within the NWS. Steve worked for 4 years as the Manager of Aviation Training and Standards for Weathernews in Norman, Oklahoma. Steve also worked for American Airlines as a shift meteorologist and training coordinator for nearly 15 years.

Aircraft Maintenance and Modification panelists:

Martin J. Bailey is the manager of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) General Aviation Maintenance Branch, Aircraft Maintenance Division, Flight Standards Service. Mr. Bailey came to Aviation Safety/Flight Standards in 1995 when he began work as a principal maintenance inspector at the Louisville Flight Standards District Office (FSDO). He provided safety oversight for repair stations, aviation maintenance schools and commuter air carriers. He has held various positions as an inspector within Flight Standards, including work on system safety at Air Transportation Oversight System Certificate Management Office (ATOS CMO). He also led work groups to develop and implement enhancements to the repair station oversight process and incorporate risk management principles. In his current role, his responsibilities include developing policy and procedures for general aviation maintenance, airmen certification, aviation maintenance schools, and designees.

Mr. Bailey began his aviation career in the United States (U.S.) Air Force in 1979. While on active duty from 1979-1988, he worked on the SR71. Upon leaving active duty in 1988, he worked as a civilian mechanic at an FAA-certificated repair station before joining the FAA the following year as an aviation maintenance technician (AMT) with Aviation System Standards (known informally as "Flight Check"). Mr. Bailey continued working on military aircraft until his retirement from the Air National Guard in 2000.

Henry "H.G." Frautschy joined the staff of the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) in 1990 as the editor of Vintage Airplane magazine and has served as the Executive Director of EAA's Vintage Aircraft Association (VAA) since 2000. As VAA Executive Director, Mr. Frautschy works with government and industry leaders to preserve the right to fly historic civilian aircraft, administers the operations of the 6,500-member VAA Division, and provides technical support to EAA members on vintage aircraft maintenance and operational issues. He is a member of the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM), serving on ASTM Committee F.39, on which he served as one of the co-chairmen of the FAA's joint industry/government Part 23 Certification Process Review. He is currently serving as one of the members of the FAA's Part 23 Aviation Rulemaking Committee. In his continued role as editor of Vintage Airplane and Vintage Aircraft Online, Mr. Frautschy writes both print and online articles that highlight the accomplishments of the members of the VAA and cover technical issues of concern to vintage aircraft owners and restorers. A 1980 graduate of Parks College of St. Louis University with a Bachelor of Science degree in aircraft maintenance management, Mr. Frautschy also holds a private pilot certificate with a seaplane rating, as well as airframe and powerplant mechanic certificates with an Inspection Authorization.

Douglas C. Macnair serves as Vice President of Government Relations for the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) in Washington, D.C. His primary role involves the oversight and conduct of government relations and advocacy on behalf of more than 175,000 EAA members and the sport and recreational aviation community as a whole. Prior to joining EAA, Mr. Macnair held the position of Vice President of Government and Technical Affairs with the Professional Aviation Maintenance Association and previously served for more than a decade as Director of Regulatory and Certification Policy for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Mr. Macnair has worked as an aircraft mechanic in general and corporate aviation, holds FAA mechanic and commercial pilot certificates, and has previously served as an on-air traffic reporter and flight instructor. Mr. Macnair is a graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University with a Bachelor's degree in Professional Aeronautics. His background also includes professional education and experience in aviation safety program management, accident investigation, administrative law, federal rulemaking, and FAA enforcement policies and procedures. Mr. Macnair is a recognized proponent of the general aviation industry and the promotion of sport and recreational aviation.

Dale Forton has worked in aviation for more than 32 years and, as a licensed A&P Technician, he has been an active Professional Aviation Maintenance Association (PAMA) member for 27 of those. He has served on the PAMA Board of Directors for 7 years as the Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors, Great Lakes Regional Director, Membership Committee Chairman, Governance Committee Chairman, and Strategic Planning Committee Chairman. In April 2011, Mr. Forton was hired as the President of PAMA. Formerly a Director of Maintenance for 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 135, 145, and 147 operations, he has also held positions as Service Manager, Parts Manager, Technician, and Director of Product Support. His aviation maintenance background consists of general and corporate aviation aircraft with some on-call airline maintenance. He has maintained aircraft ranging from Piper Cubs to Dassault Falcons. Mr. Forton has owned his own businesses for several years as well; AEROWORKS, an aircraft hardware and component distributor, BKD Aerospace, distributor of lifts to increase accessibility to aircraft for persons with restricted mobility, E Sales & Service, a local eBay consignment business, and Pixel Tech Designs, a graphic and web design firm.

Joe Hawkins is a certificated Airframe and Powerplant Technician with a current Inspection Authorization. With 30 years of aviation maintenance experience in regional service centers and state government, Mr. Hawkins is now an associate professor who teaches courses across the maintenance management, technology, and professional pilot curriculums at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU). His research on technician fatigue, innovative aircraft systems and curriculum development has been presented at numerous international aerospace conferences and published in the Aerospace Medical Association Journal and Collegiate Aviation Review, among other publications. In addition to being a director and scholarship committee chair for the AMTSociety, he served on the Board of Directors for the Aviation Technical Education Council from 2006-2010. He is the Technical Program Director for the Tennessee Mid-South Aviation Maintenance Conference held annually in Nashville, and he has been a FAA Safety Team Lead Representative for the Central Region since 1993. In 2005, he was named the Tennessee Aviation Maintenance Technician of the Year; in 2006, he was selected as the FAA's National Aviation Maintenance Technician of the Year; and in 2008, he was inducted into the Tennessee Aviation Hall of Fame. Mr. Hawkins holds a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Maintenance Management with a minor in Industrial Technologies and a Master of Education in Aerospace from MTSU. He is a U.S. Army veteran and served as a CH-47 Chinook helicopter Flight Engineer with the 101st Airborne Division.

New Aircraft Design and Certification panelists' biographies:

Earl Lawrence began his career with the FAA in November 2010 as the Manager of the Small Airplane Directorate, which is responsible for the development of airworthiness standards, policy and guidance for small aircraft and administrates the type, production, and airworthiness certification in addition to continued operational safety for small airplanes, gliders, airships, and balloons worldwide. Mr. Lawrence is regularly involved with the engineering, manufacturing, continued airworthiness, and administrative activities involving all aeronautical products within the geographical boundaries encompassing 21 states and international general aviation aircraft projects. A graduate of Northrop University in Los Angeles, Mr. Lawrence previously he held the post of vice president of industry and regulatory affairs for the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, having joined the EAA staff in March 1994. His earlier career focused on aircraft and spacecraft maintenance and construction. He had worked for Rockwell Rocketdyne division in Canoga Park, California, first as a rocket engine mechanic and then as a manufacturing engineer, gaining experience in engineering, administration, production, quality assurance, and management. Mr. Lawrence is a past member of the Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, the ASTM International Board of Directors and the chairman of the ASTM International Committee F37 on Light Sport Aircraft. In recognition of his standards work for Light Sport Aircraft, Mr. Lawrence received the 2003 Robert J. Painter Memorial Award from the Standards Engineering Society. Along with his work on light sport aircraft standards, Mr. Lawrence was EAA's engineer responsible for the autogas STCs and EAA's representative for aviation fuel standards. A pilot since 1987, Mr. Lawrence holds a commercial multi-engine pilot certificate as well as an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate with an Inspection Authorization. He currently owns and flies a Piper Twin Comanche.

Tim Timmerman is the Director of the SR2X Program at Cirrus Aircraft with responsibilities for new product development along with production and field engineering support for the piston fleet. He joined Cirrus in 2000 as a structural engineer and has held various engineering management positions since then. Prior to Cirrus, Mr. Timmerman spent 6 years with Lockheed Martin as a structural engineer on thrust reversers, rockets, and interplanetary spacecraft. He graduated with a Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Colorado at Denver, and Bachelor's in Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics from the University of Minnesota. He has been a pilot since 2000, holds commercial single- and multi-engine instrument ratings, and owns a Cirrus SR20.

Kristine Hartzell is the Chief Flight Instructor for the AOPA Foundation's Air Safety Institute and has been an active flight instructor since 1994. She holds airline transport pilot, certified flight instructor, CFII, and multiengine instructor certificates with type ratings in the Airbus A319, Canadair CL65, and British Aerospace Jetstream 3201. Mrs. Hartzell has previously worked as a pilot, Check Airman, and Human Factors Manager at a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 air carrier and Chief Pilot for a 14 CFR Part 135 charter operator.

Gregory J. Bowles is the Director of Engineering and Manufacturing for the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), the trade association that represents the manufacturers of certified airplanes. In this role at GAMA, Mr. Bowles works with members of government and industry on technical and regulatory issues. He focuses on legislation, policy, and regulation affecting airframe, systems, and avionics design and also in the area of aerospace manufacturing and quality. Mr. Bowles is also the industry co-chair on the FAA's 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 23 Reorganization Aviation Rulemaking Committee, which has been chartered to update the current 14 CFR Part 23 regulations to assure that they will address the airplanes and components that will be built and installed over the next 20 years. He holds a Bachelor's of Science in Aerospace Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and a Master's of Business Administration degree from Webster University. Mr. Bowles is also an active general aviation pilot operating out of the Washington, D.C., area.

Kirk Hawkins Before graduating from Stanford Business School and founding ICON Aircraft in 2006, Mr. Hawkins flew F-16s in the U.S. Air Force and Boeing 767s for American Airlines. Prior to the USAF, he worked in both aviation and aerospace engineering most of his early career. After earning his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Clemson University, he was the Director of Engineering at an aerospace contractor before returning for his Master's in Engineering from Stanford University in 1995.

Mr. Hawkins grew up racing motocross and has been an avid powersport and flying enthusiast for 25 years. He has built and flown ultralight and experimental aircraft and has logged nearly 1,000 skydives. Mr. Hawkins is also a seaplane instructor pilot with hundreds of hours bush flying in Alaska. Today he is an active snowboarder, kiteboarder, and SCUBA diver, as well as a devoted member of the Big Brothers and Big Sisters of America for more than 10 years.

Advanced Avionics and Handhelds panelists' biographies:

Jens Hennig is the Vice President of Operations of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) and is responsible for GAMA's safety, security, and flight operations policy. He has been active on a number of policy and regulatory committees with the FAA, the Joint Aviation Authorities, and the European Aviation Safety Agency, and he supports GAMA's legislative team on budget, security, and operational policy. Mr. Hennig promotes the FAA's General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) as the mechanism to advance general aviation safety. He co-chairs the GAJSC Safety Analysis Team, is actively involved with advancing data collection for the general aviation industry, and frequently presents on the state of general aviation. Originally from Örnsköldsvik, Sweden, Mr. Hennig holds a Master of Business Administration in Aviation and a Bachelor of Science with honors in Aerospace Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

Kristine Hartzell (see previous)

Stephen M. Casner, Ph.D., is a research psychologist at NASA Ames Research Center. For the past 20 years, Dr. Casner has researched the effects of cockpit automation on pilot performance, as well as a number of other general aviation and air carrier safety topics. He holds an Airline Transport Pilot certificate with type ratings in the B737, A320, CE500, and CE510. Dr. Casner is a Gold Seal instrument flight instructor in both airplanes and helicopters and the author of two textbooks about cockpit automation used in general aviation and air transport aircraft.

Ken Byrnes (see previous)