NTSB Press Release

National Transportation Safety Board
Office of Public Affairs


NTSB CITES LACK OF ADEQUATE FUEL AS CAUSE OF EXECUTIVE AIRLINES JETSTREAM CRASH IN BEAR CREEK, PENNSYLVANIA

August 29, 2002

Washington, D.C. - The National Transportation Safety Board has determined that inadequate fuel supply caused the crash of a British Aerospace Jetstream 31 in Bear Creek Township, Pennsylvania in May 2000. The plane crashed while on approach to Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport, killing all nineteen persons aboard --17 passengers and 2 crewmembers. The Safety Board's final accident report into the crash cited the flight crew's failure to ensure an adequate fuel supply for the flight, which led to the stoppage of the right engine due to fuel starvation and the intermittent stoppage of the left engine. The report also noted as a contributing factor the flight crew's failure to monitor the airplane's fuel state.

On the day of the accident the aircraft, which was owned and operated by Executive Airlines, flew from Farmingdale, New York to Atlantic City, New Jersey and then onto Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Investigators believe that the flight crew intended to add a total of 180 gallons of fuel, 90 gallons a side, to the airplane while at Republic Airport in Farmingdale. However, fuel receipts indicate that a miscommunication between the pilots and the fueler resulted in only a total of 90 gallons of fuel being added. Observations made at the accident site were consistent with only a small amount of fuel being on board at the time of the crash.

The entire report is available on the NTSB website. The accident number is DCA00MA052.

NTSB Office of Public Affairs: (202) 314-6100

 

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The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an independent federal agency charged with determining the probable cause
of transportation accidents, promoting transportation safety, and assisting victims of transportation accidents and their families.