NTSB Press Release

National Transportation Safety Board
Office of Public Affairs


NTSB CHAIRMAN SUPPORTS THE NATIONAL SAFE KIDS CAMPAIGN'S PROGRAM TO RATE STATES ON THE QUALITY OF CHILD PASSENGER SAFETY LAWS

February 8, 2001

Washington, D.C. -- National Transportation Safety Board Acting Chairman Carol Carmody today commended the National Safe Kids Campaign for its important effort to rate child passenger protection laws of the 50 states. The Campaign gave California an "A" and Florida a "B." All other states got a "C" or lower.

The Safety Board has previously called upon the states to strengthen their child passenger protection laws as a result of a 1996 safety study on the performance and use of child safety seats, seat belts, and air bags for children in passenger vehicles. In addition the Board has emphasized the importance of providing one level of safety - the highest level - for children.

Specifically, the Board has recommended that:

"Today's announcement by the National Safe Kids Campaign clearly identifies the deficiencies in each State's law," said Acting Chairman Carol Carmody, "and shows that, with one exception, none of the States have fulfilled this most basic responsibility to our youngest and most vulnerable citizens. I am encouraged that Safe Kids is committing to work over the next five years to strengthen the existing State laws."

The Safety Board has included child and youth safety in transportation on its list of Most Wanted Safety Improvements. Acting Chairman Carmody took exception to the National Safe Kids Campaign rating of Florida with an above average grade because it does not require children between the ages of 4 and 8 to be restrained in booster seats.

NTSB Media Contact:
Keith Holloway
(202) 314-6100
hollowk@ntsb.gov  

 

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The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an independent federal agency charged with determining the probable cause
of transportation accidents, promoting transportation safety, and assisting victims of transportation accidents and their families.