CEN10LA243
CEN10LA243

On May 7, 2010, approximately 1905 central daylight time, a Mooney M20G, N9221V, was substantially damaged following a loss of directional control and subsequent impact with terrain during initial takeoff. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured. The airplane was owned and operated by a private individual. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight. The cross-country flight was departing the Benton Regional Airport (KSUZ), Benton, Arkansas, at the time of the accident.

According to a statement provided by the pilot, the airplane was attempting to depart runway 02. While on the takeoff roll, the airplane was rotated at 65 knots and was accelerating to 75 knots. The pilot reported that the airplane began an uncommanded right yaw. The pilot attempted to correct with rudder inputs, but then the airplane rolled and yaw to the left. The pilot added that an "excessive" amount of aileron was required to level the airplane. When the airplane was approximately 20 feet above ground level and at about 80 knots, the pilot attempted to land the airplane on the remaining runway. During the landing, the pilot reported that the landing was normal until the right landing gear folded into the wheel well. The pilot tried to keep the right wing up by banking left. The left gear collapsed and the left wing struck the ground. The airplane's nose gear separated from the fuselage and the propeller struck the ground. The airplane skidded off the left side of the runway. An examination of the airframe by the responding FAA inspector revealed that the left wing was bent upwards just inboard of the aileron. Control continuity was established to the ailerons and elevator. Impact damage to the fuselage precluded an examination of the rudder system; however, the rudder was properly secured to the control mounts. No pre-impact anomalies were detected with the airframe or engine. Marks on the runway consistent with contact of the left wing were found approximately 1,450 feet down the runway and with propeller strikes were found approximately 1,550 feet down the runway.

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