ERA10LA222
ERA10LA222

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 11, 2010, at 1745 Atlantic standard time, a Beech 95-A55, N9646Y, was substantially damaged after impacting the ground during a forced landing, approximately two miles south of Antonio (Nery) Juarbe Pol Airport (TJAB), Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The private pilot/owner and sole passenger were seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to an interview conducted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) the pilot reported that while flying on the downwind leg and beginning a turn to a left base leg the left engine experienced a total loss of power. He further reported that the airplane experienced a temporary loss of control; he retarded both throttles, and regained directional control. The pilot further stated that the airplane was approximately one-quarter to one-half mile from the runway threshold and due to the altitude he decided to make an off airport landing in a field directly ahead of the airplane which contained low trees, brush and grass.

The passenger reported to the FAA that while in flight one engine had failed and that the pilot elected to shut down the other engine. The pilot stated to the passenger that "to prevent further damage on impact to the running engine and propeller; he was going to shut down the other [operating] engine." She further stated that on the morning of the accident they bought about 40 gallons of fuel and transported the fuel in containers and put the fuel in the airplane. She also stated that the flight departed from TJAB, flew to Cyril E King Airport (TSIT), Charlotte Amalie, United States Virgin Islands flew to Fernando Luis Ribas Dominicci Airport (TJIG), San Juan, Puerto Rico to clear customs and at the time of the accident were enroute to TJAB, where the airplane was based.

According to fuel records the pilot purchased 44 gallons of aviation gasoline at 0500 on the morning of the accident.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to FAA records the accident pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and multi-engine land airplane; he also reported 550 total hours of flight experience. His most recent FAA third-class medical was issued in September 28, 2009. After several attempts to contact the pilot family members stated that he was still in critical condition and at the time of this writing the pilot had not been able fill out the NTSB 6120 Pilot Aircraft Accident Report.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA records the airplane was a Beech 95-A55 manufactured in 1962. It was equipped with two Continental Motors IO-470 series engines. It was a high performance, all-metal, low-wing, multi-engine cantilever monoplane with fully retractable tricycle landing gear. The aircraft maintenance records were located by the FAA. According to the logbook the most recent annual inspection was dated March 1, 2009 and at that time the aircraft total time in service was 4,664.7 hours which correlated to an engine total time in service of 176.7 hours.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The FAA inspector that responded to the accidents sight reported to the Safety Board investigator that the airplane impacted the ground in a remote location, with a level pitch attitude, and with the landing gear in the retracted position. The right wing fuel tank had been breached during the accident sequence and that the left wing fuel tank contained approximately 8 gallons of fuel. Both propellers indicated no rotation at the time of impact. The fuel filters were removed, examined, contained a few drops of fuel, and there was no evidence of any foreign matter. The fuel selector valves were on the auxiliary tanks, the fuel quantity indicator selector switch was on the main tanks position, and the left and right fuel boost pump switches were in the "OFF" position.

Left Engine

The left engine was examined by a representative from the engine manufacturer with oversight provided by the FAA. The engine remained attached to the left wing, the three-bladed constant speed propeller separated from the crankshaft flange consistent with impact damage. All of the cylinders and accessories remained attached and continuity was confirmed when the crankshaft was rotated by hand and oil was present in the engine. All of the cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope. The cylinder bores were free of scoring. Suction and compression were obtained on all cylinders when the crankshaft was rotated by hand. Both magnetos remained attached to the engine and a blue spark was observed from all ignition leads when the crankshaft was rotated by hand. The top and bottom spark plugs exhibited normal operating signatures. The fuel pump remained attached to the engine, and was removed for examination. The drive coupling was intact and the fuel pump drive shaft rotated freely when turned by hand and operated when the drive shaft was rotated using a hand tool.

The fuel manifold valve screen and fuel inlet filter screen was free of obstructions and debris and there was no indication of fuel leakage in the vent chamber side of the diaphragm. All fuel nozzles were attached to their respective fuel lines and were free of obstructions. The throttle plate was observed near the full open position and the mixture control valve was observed near the full rich position. The mixture and throttle control levers moved freely by hand. The oil filter screen was examined; oil residue was present and no obstruction or debris was observed. The propeller governor control cable remained attached to the propeller governor control arm and was observed near the full-forward position. The drive shaft rotated freely by hand; however, the governor control arm exhibited damage and was not able to be moved by hand. The propeller governor oil screen exhibited an oil residue and no obstructions or debris was observed. All damage observed was consistent with impact damage.

Right Engine

The right engine was examined by a representative from the engine manufacturer with oversight provided by the FAA. The engine remained attached to the right wing, and the three-bladed constant speed propeller remained attached at the crankshaft flange. All of the cylinders and accessories remained attached and continuity was confirmed when the crankshaft was rotated by hand and oil was present in the engine. All of the cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope. The cylinder bores were free of scoring. Suction and compression were obtained on all cylinders when the crankshaft was rotated by hand. Both magnetos remained attached to the engine and a blue spark was observed from all ignition leads when the crankshaft was rotated by hand. The top and bottom spark plugs exhibited normal operating signatures. The fuel pump remained attached to the engine, and was removed for examination. The drive coupling was intact and the fuel pump drive shaft rotated freely when turned by hand and operated when the drive shaft was rotated using a hand tool.

The fuel manifold valve screen was free of obstructions and debris, the fuel inlet filter screen contained debris, and there was no indication of fuel leakage in the vent chamber side of the diaphragm. All fuel nozzles were attached to their respective fuel lines and were free of obstructions. The throttle plate was observed near the full open position and the mixture control valve was observed near the full rich position. The mixture and throttle control levers moved freely by hand. The oil filter screen was examined; oil residue was present and no obstruction or debris was observed. The propeller governor control arm moved freely by hand and was observed near the mid-travel position. The governor drive shaft rotated freely by hand. The propeller governor oil screen exhibited an oil residue and no obstructions or debris was observed.

METEROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1750 recorded weather observation at Rafael Hernandez Airport (TJBQ), Aquadilla, Puerto Rico, located 26 nautical miles to the southwest of the accident location, included winds from 080 degrees at 18 knots with gust of 26 knots, scattered clouds at 2,500 feet above ground level, 10 miles visibility, temperature 26 degrees C, dew point 19 C, and an altimeter setting of 29.93 inches of mercury.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to the airplane's pilot's operating handbook, section II, "Limitations," states in part "takeoff and land on main fuel tank only...The fuel crossfeed system [is] to be used during emergency conditions in level flight only." According to photos provided by the FAA a placard located on the fuel selector valve also provided the same limitation.

A placard located on the dash next to the airspeed indicator states in part "One Engine in Flight control airplane, maintain airspeed >100 KIAS..." According to photographs provided by the FAA, 100 KIAS on the airspeed indicator was also depicted with a blue radial line.

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