CEN10CA100
CEN10CA100

The pilot contacted an Automated Flight Service Station for a weather briefing around 0730 on the morning of the flight. At that time he was informed that visual flight rules (VFR) flight was not recommended and that instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) were expected to remain along the route until at least 1200. The briefer stated that the ceiling at the pilot’s destination of the Washington Municipal Airport (AWG), Washington, Iowa, would probably be 2,000 feet overcast at best later in the day. The pilot decided to delay the flight until later in the day. At 1600, the pilot departed Tulsa, Oklahoma, without obtaining another weather briefing. He requested and was receiving flight following during the flight. The pilot reported that while en route he was going to stop for fuel; however, the airport was IMC so he decided to continue to his destination. Upon reaching AWG he determined that the weather was IMC, so he diverted to the Cedar Rapids-Eastern Iowa (CID) Airport, where he requested emergency assistance. The approach controller offered a VFR airport in Minnesota; however, the pilot stated he did not have enough fuel to get there. The pilot stated he had practiced instrument landing system (ILS) approaches during a flight review. The controller then gave the pilot vectors and a frequency for the ILS runway 27 approach. The pilot stated he flew a course of about 280 degrees because of the winds and attempted to maintain the glideslope, but he became confused by the glideslope needle. The airplane contacted the terrain about 2 miles east of the airport. The pilot received minor injuries and was able to call for help using his cell phone. The airplane received substantial damage to the fuselage and wings.

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