ANC09LA103
ANC09LA103

On September 18, 2009, about 1400 Alaska daylight time, a tundra tire-equipped Piper PA-18 airplane, N1169A, sustained substantial damage when it collided with trees and brush after takeoff from a remote airstrip, about 12 miles south of Nabesna, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) other work use flight, in support of the operator’s hunting guide business, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, when the accident occurred. The commercial pilot and one passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and company flight following procedures were in effect. At the time of the accident the flight was returning to the operator's remote lodge near Nabesna, with a hunting client aboard.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on September 18, the pilot related that before departing from the 800 foot long, rough and uneven airstrip, he assessed his passenger's weight, along with wind conditions before electing to depart to the south. He characterized the winds as light and variable, but from a southerly direction. Just after takeoff, as the airplane climbed to about 10 feet above the ground, the pilot realized that the wind was now out of the north, and the airplane stopped climbing as it neared the departure end of the airstrip. The airplane collided with a stand of trees and brush, coming to rest about 75 feet from the departure end of the airstrip, sustaining substantial damage to the wings and empennage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical anomalies with the airplane.

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