DFW07LA075
DFW07LA075

On February 21, 2007, about 1725 central standard time, a twin-engine Piper PA-30 airplane, N7900Y, was substantially damaged during a hard landing and subsequent loss of directional control at the Town & Country Airpark (F82) near Lubbock, Texas. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

Personnel at the airport reported that following a landing on Runway 17, (a 3,500-foot long, by 70-foot-wide asphalt runway), the airplane swerved and exited off the right side of the runway followed by a ground-loop. The airplane came to rest in an upright position with the nose gear collapsed. The pilot and passenger were able to exit the airplane unassisted.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, who responded to the accident site, tire transfer marks were observed starting about 1,700-feet from the approach end of Runway 17. Tire transfer marks on the runway revealed that the nose landing gear tire touched down first followed by the right main landing gear tire and subsequently the left main landing gear tire. Additionally, a flat spot on the right landing gear tire was also reported by the inspector. No pre-impact anomalies were noted with the airplane's controls. The inspector further reported that the left wing and nose landing gear to fuselage mounting structure had sustained structural damage.

The pilot submitted a 6120.1/2 to the NTSB investigator-in-charge; however, he did not provide a written narrative on the accounts of the mishap.

At 1653, a weather reporting station at Lubbock International Airport (LBB), near Lubbock Texas, located 5 miles north from the accident site, was reporting wind from 310 degrees at 6 knots, visibility 10 statue miles, clear skies, temperature 73 degrees Fahrenheit, dew point 19 degrees Fahrenheit, and a barometric pressure setting of 29.97 inches of Mercury.

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