ANC05CA050
ANC05CA050

On March 19, 2005, about 1200 Alaska standard time, a tundra tire-equipped Piper PA-18 airplane, N3996Z, sustained substantial damage when it collided with the ground and nosed over during takeoff/initial climb from a remote area, about 16 miles west-southwest of False Pass, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) local area personal flight under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by the pilot. The private certificated pilot, and the sole passenger, received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was intended to return to False Pass Airport, and no flight plan was filed, nor was one required.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on March 21, the pilot reported that he previously landed on an open area of tundra, which was about 800 feet long by 600 feet wide. He said the wind was from the southeast about 10 to 15 knots, and he began a takeoff toward the southeast. The pilot said that just after liftoff, a few feet in the air, the airplane encountered a downdraft. The left wing struck the ground, and the airplane then collided with the ground and nosed over. The airplane received damage to both wings, the fuselage, empennage, and propeller.

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