NYC04CA072
NYC04CA072

On February 13, 2004, about 2040 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172, N8880V, was substantially damaged while landing at Mount Snow Airport (4V8), West Dover, Vermont. The certificated private pilot and passenger were not injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight that departed Hartford-Brainard Airport, Hartford, Connecticut. No flight plan was filed for the personal flight conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.

According to the pilot's initial written statement to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the weather during cruise flight included excellent visibility and calm winds. The pilot experienced "minor" turbulence on the downwind leg to runway 19 at 4V8, which increased dramatically as the airplane turned onto the base leg. The wind was "tossing" the airplane around and down. The pilot continued the approach and touched down about "1/4 down" the 2,650-foot long, 75-foot wide, asphalt runway. However, the airplane bounced, traveled off the end of the runway, and came to rest inverted in the snow. The pilot did not mention a go-around in his initial statement.

According to the pilot's subsequent written statement to the Safety Board, he received a weather briefing from a flight service station prior to takeoff, which included a forecast of calm winds at the departure and destination airport. While on the downwind leg for runway 19, the airplane encountered "severe" turbulence, which "tossed" the airplane to the right and downward. The pilot further stated that he contemplated a go-around, but thought that it may not be completed successfully with the wind shear. The pilot subsequently continued the approach and touched down about "1/4 down" the runway. The airplane bounced, traveled off the end of the runway, and came to rest inverted in the snow.

The pilot received his private pilot certificate about 7 months prior to the accident. He reported a total flight experience of approximately 86 hours; of which, about 11 hours were at night. Prior to the accident flight, the pilot had not flown to 4V8, which was located in mountainous terrain.

The reported wind at an airport approximately 17 miles west of the accident site, at 2054, was from 220 degrees at 3 knots.

The reported wind at an airport approximately 35 miles north of the accident site, at 2035, was from 270 degrees at 15 knots, gusting to 24 knots.

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