FTW03FA064
FTW03FA064

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On December 24, 2002, approximately 0954 central standard time, a Beech BE-58 twin-engine airplane, N5TV, collided with terrain during an uncontrolled descent near Egypt, Arkansas. The airplane was registered to Thomas Aviation, Inc., of Hardy, Arkansas, and operated by the registered owner/pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The instrument rated commercial pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed by the impact and the post accident fire. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed for the cross-country flight, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed. The personal flight departed Cherokee Village Airport (CVK) at Ash Flat, Arkansas, approximately 0921 with a planned destination of Jonesboro (JBR), Arkansas.

During interviews, conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC), acquaintances reported that the purpose of the flight was to fly the airplane to JBR to have an alternator switch installed at Sharp Aviation.

Air traffic control data was reviewed by the NTSB IIC and all times converted to central standard time unless otherwise noted. At 0905, the pilot contacted the JBR AFSS, filed an IFR flight plan (N5TV, BE-58/G, true airspeed 170 knots, proposed time off 0930, altitude 5,000 feet msl, time en route 35 minutes, fuel on board 6 hours) from CVK to JBR, requested, and was briefed on the current weather (0853 weather facility observation) at JBR. The weather briefing reported wind 050 degrees at 15 knots, ceiling 700 overcast, visibility 10 statute miles, temperature 1 degree Celsius, dew point 0 degree Celsius, and the altimeter reading 29.73 inches Mercury; remarks, pressure falling. The weather briefing included PIREP: over Newport (M19), Arkansas, at 0905, flight level 7,000 feet msl, a Mitsubishi MU-2 reported ceiling overcast 900 feet msl tops 5,000 feet msl with cirrus clouds above, icing 2,300 feet msl through 3,300 feet msl during climb out to the south. The weather briefer informed the pilot about the airmet for icing and turbulence.

At 0919:49 the pilot contacted JBR AFSS for the departure clearance, and the flight was cleared as filed, climb and maintain 5,000 feet msl, transponder squawk 5524, contact Memphis Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) frequency 127.4 Megahertz (MHz) upon departure from CVK. Clearance void 0935, time now 0921.

At 0928:03, radio and radar contact (3,100 feet climbing to 5,000 feet msl) were established with the airplane by Memphis ARTCC.

At 0930:30, the pilot reported airplane level at 5,000 feet msl.

At 0934:37, the pilot reported airplane icing at 4,800 feet msl, requested, and received a clearance to descend the airplane to 4,000 feet msl.

At 0938:40, the pilot requested to deviate for landing at Walnut Ridge Regional Airport (ARG).

At 0940:02, the pilot was cleared for the RNAV/GPS 36 approach at ARG, maintain 3,000 feet msl until the initial approach fix (IAF) waypoint GUBFO.

At 0941:43, the controller approved a frequency change for the pilot to contact the ARG common traffic airport advisory frequency (CTAF) 122.8 MHz.

A0941:46, the pilot reported changing to the airport advisory frequency. Subsequently, the pilot contacted CTAF and received the airport advisory. No distress calls or additional communications with the pilot were recorded.

Two witnesses, who heard the impact, exited their residence, observed the airplane, the post accident fire, and called 911. Local authorities responded to the accident site.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A review of the FAA records and copies of the pilot's logbooks by the NTSB IIC revealed that the pilot began flight training in November 1999. The pilot was issued his most recent FAA third-class medical certificate on December 17, 1999, without limitations. On April 28, 2000, the pilot was issued his private pilot certificate with the airplane single-engine land rating, following an initial disapproval on his practical examination on April 15, 2000. On November 17, 2000, the instrument rating was added to the private pilot certificate, following three disapproved instrument practical examinations conducted on November 3, 2000, November 10, 2000, and November 10, 2000, respectively. On August 25, 2001, the multiengine land rating, with the limitation VFR only, was added to the private pilot certificate, following two disapproved multiengine practical examinations conducted on August 11, 2001, and August 12, 2001, respectively. On February 2, 2002, the multiengine land limitation for VFR flight was removed from the pilot certificate. On August 6, 2002, the pilot was issued his commercial pilot certificate with the ratings and limitations of airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, and instrument. The FAA records indicated that all of the pilot's practical examinations were administered by FAA Designated Pilot Examiners (DPEs).

As logged on November 18, 2002, the pilot had accumulated a total flight time of 1,027.4 hours (instrument flight time 151.3 hours of which 45.3 hours were in actual instrument conditions). His accumulated pilot-in-command flight time was 806.2 hours.

The pilot's first flight in N5TV was a dual instructional flight on June 10, 2001. As of November 17, 2002, the pilot had accumulated a flight time of 546.2 hours in the accident airplane, of which 107.9 hours were logged within the 90 days prior to the accident flight. The pilot had accumulated a flight time of 75.8 hours of instrument flight in N5TV, of which 38.6 hours were in actual instrument conditions (9.2 hours actual in the 90 days prior to the accident flight).

Interviews with immediate family members and acquaintances disclosed that the day before the accident, the pilot arrived at Memphis, Tennessee, on a commercial airline flight from Colorado. Subsequently, the pilot flew N5TV on a cross-country flight from Memphis, Tennessee, to Cherokee Village [Ash Flat, Arkansas]. Approximately 1900, the flight landed at CVK. Airport fueling records at CVK for December 23, 2002, indicated a purchase of 25.82 gallons (100LL aviation fuel) that evening.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Beech BE-58 airplane (S/N TH-193) was manufactured in 1971. On January 18, 1972, the airplane was issued the FAA registration number of N5TV and a standard airworthiness certificate. Registration to the current owner was dated July 18, 2001. At the time of the accident, the airplane was configured to carry 5 passengers and one pilot.

The NTSB IIC reviewed the aircraft records, insurance records, maintenance work orders, and the available maintenance logbooks. Interviews with acquaintances disclosed that the latest maintenance logbooks should have been in the airplane; however, no evidence of the logbooks was found at the accident site. Acquaintances disclosed that the aircraft heater was inoperative, and the pilot would take a blanket to put around his legs during flight. Further, to their knowledge, the alcohol reservoir for the propeller anti-ice system had not been serviced.

On December 10, 2002, at the accumulated airframe time of 3,914.0 hours (Hobbs 2,841.1), both engines were serviced with Phillips XC 20W-50 oil. The right propeller governor (P/N 210662, S/N 1573451) was reinstalled after warranty repair. Both of the remanufactured factory engines had accumulated 276.4 hours since installed in the airframe.

In October 2002, the electrical charging system was checked and a broken wire repaired.

The last annual inspection was performed on April 05, 2002, at accumulated airframe time of 3,637.5 hours (Hobbs 2,564.7 hours). A Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) IO-520-CB (factory remanufactured "0" time) engine was installed in each engine nacelle (left S/N 299465-R, right S/N 299466-R). Both engines had a McCauley propeller (overhauled) model D2AF34C30-NP/78FF-0 (left S/N 710536, right S/N 71300) installed. Both engines were equipped with General Aviation Modifications, Inc., (GAMI) fuel injectors (kit GAD13AA, serial number 9829) in accordance with STC # SE09217SC. Both engines had a Woodward governor (overhauled) model 210662 (left S/N 1573451K, right S/N 1040685C) installed. Both engines were equipped with a new Tanis (TAS100-12) pre-heater (left S/N 34124, right S/N 34125). Both engines had a vacuum pump (overhauled P/N 242CW, S/N 3745) installed. In April 2002, the Goodrich WX-500 storm scope was installed, interfaced to the Garmin GNS-430 for display, and proper operation was verified. The bulb in the left navigation light, the flight instrument dimmer transistor, and the instrument flood light transistor were replaced.

On February 27, 2002, a new cabin heater ignition unit P/N 11C30-1, S/N A01120023, was installed and operational check satisfactory. On February 18, 2002, the heater ignition unit was replaced and the replacement unit was found to have a defective coil. The ignition vibrator was removed from the new unit, and the original unit installed for temporary repair. The defective coil, sent for warranty replacement, was to be reinstalled in the airframe at the owner's request. In January 2002, the heater was inspected and heater thermostat was found set too high-tripping the overtemp[erature]. The thermostat was readjusted to 180 degrees Fahrenheit. The heater fuse and heater fuel system was found satisfactory, and the system was to receive further troubleshooting at a later date.

During June through August 2001, the electrical system maintenance included the following items: The #2 voltage regulator, P/N 36-380096-1; S/N 80285517, and control fuse were removed and replaced. The altitude hold autopilot servo plug was cleaned, and the autopilot servo checked satisfactory. The left alternator out sensor, P/N 36-380000-3, the intercom audio panel system, and a wire for the #2 communication lamp was replaced. The AC/DC inverter was replaced, and the AC/DC inverter, rheostats, and transistors for the sub panel, glare shield, and flight instruments were replaced. The NAV coupler was reconnected, the switch for the navigation 1 and 2 was replaced, the wiring repaired, the bulbs replaced, and the HSI rewired to instrument dimmer buss, ADF, HSI, and post lights. Under the pilot's seat, the lighting power transistor sockets and intermittent wire/butt splice connection was repaired. Two broken wires behind the instrument panel were repaired. The static system, altimeter (P/N 5934P-1; S/N R3999), and automatic pressure altitude reporting system was tested to 20,000 feet msl and inspected as required by FAR 411, Part 43, Appendix E and F. The Garmin GMA-340 Audio Panel and a Garmin GNS-430 Com/Nav/GPS was installed. The GMA-340 was interfaced with the GNS-430, KX-175B, and the KR-85. The GNS-340 was interfaced with the GMA-340, the HSI, and the autopilot. The installed GPS was not approved for IFR operations. The unfeathering accumulators for both propellers were serviced. The standby compass was removed and replaced.

In August 2000, Micro AeroDynamics, Inc., vortex generators were installed on the wings and rudder in accordance with the installation instructions contained in STC SA5175NM.

In November 1998, the heater fuel line was reconnected. The system tested satisfactory for pressure and performance.

In July 1997, the heater was inspected and "found to be unsatisfactory (inoperative), heater fuel line was disconnected and power supply disabled and heater labeled inoperative. Anti-ice system placarded inoperative due to crackers in slinger tubes-to be replaced at next propeller removal.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

An NTSB meteorologist derived the following information from his review of National Weather Service (NWS), National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), Aviation Weather Center (AWC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL), and the Geostationary Environmental Satellite-8 (GOES-8).

A Surface Analysis chart prepared by the NWS NCEP for 0900 December 24 indicated a low pressure center over southeastern Mississippi and a large ridge of high pressure over the Rocky Mountains. Station plots in Arkansas indicated overcast clouds and patchy restricted visibilities due to rain and mist. The NWS 850 millibar (about 5,000 feet) Analysis charts for 0600 and 1800 December 24 showed a low pressure center near the Arkansas-Tennessee-Mississippi border. Station plots indicated a nearly saturated atmosphere throughout the region.

At 0935, the Batesville Municipal Airport (BVX), Arkansas (field elevation 464 feet msl, located approximately 257 degrees at 34 nautical miles from the accident site) unaugmented Automated Weather Observing System-3 (ASOS-3) reported the wind from 320 degrees at 7 knots; visibility 1 1/2 miles, sky overcast 200 feet, temperature 1 degree Celsius, dew point zero degree Celsius, and the altimeter setting 29.82 inches Mercury.

At 0955, the BVX ASOS-3 reported the wind from 320 degrees at 10 knots gusting 14 knots, visibility 2 miles, sky broken 200 feet overcast 1,000 feet, temperature 1 degree Celsius, dew point zero degree Celsius, and the altimeter 29.82 inches Mercury.

At 0853, the Jonesboro Municipal Airport (JRB), Arkansas (field elevation 262 feet msl, located approximately 094 degrees at 16 nautical miles from the accident site) weather observation facility (ASOS) reported the wind from 050 degrees at 15 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky overcast 700 feet, temperature 1 degree Celsius, dew point zero degree Celsius, and the altimeter setting 29.73 inches Mercury. The remarks: pressure falling rapidly.

At 0953, the weather observation facility at JBR reported the wind from 010 degrees at 10 knots gusting 18 knots, visibility 1 1/2 miles, light rain, mist, sky overcast 700 feet, temperature 1 degree Celsius, dew point 1 degree Celsius, and the altimeter setting 29.75 inches Mercury. The remarks: rain began 0924, unknown precipitation began 0925 ended 0933, snow began 0945 ended 0950, ceiling 500 feet variable 1,000 feet.

At 0935, the weather observation facility at Walnut Ridge (ARG), Arkansas (located approximately 008 degrees at 17 nautical miles from the accident site) reported wind from 360 degrees at 11 knots, visibility 1 1/4 statute mile, sky overcast 80 feet, temperature 1 degree Celsius, dew point minus 1 degree Celsius, and the altimeter setting 29.80 inches Mercury.

At 0955, the weather observation facility at ARG reported wind from 340 degrees at 12 knots, visibility 1 statute mile, sky broken 300 feet overcast 800 feet, temperature 1 degree Celsius, dew point minus 1 degree Celsius, and the altimeter setting 29.80 inches Mercury.

A review of the PIREPS for Arkansas archived at the NCDC, Ashville, North, Carolina for the period from 0400 to 1200 December 24, 2002, revealed in part the following two PIREPS:

At 0838, a Beech BE-58, multiengine airplane, at 7,000 feet msl reported sky overcast 1,000 feet with top of overcast at 6,000 feet, temperature 10 degrees Celsius, wind from 221 degrees at 39 knots, light icing at 3,000 feet to 4,000 feet during climb to the south from Little Rock, Arkansas.

At 0905, a Mitsubishi MU2 multiengine airplane, at 7,000 feet msl reported sky overcast 900 feet with top of overcast 5,000 feet, light icing 2,300 feet to 3,300 feet during climb to the south from Newport (located about 228 degrees at 23 nautical miles from the accident site). According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the JBR Automated Flight Service Station (AFSS) provided the Newport PIREP to the pilot of N5TV.

Using McIDAS, infrared (band 4) data along N5TV's proposed route revealed the cloud-top radiative temperatures in the vicinity of CVK for 0933 and 0948 were about -7 and -3 degrees Celsius, respectively. The cloud-top temperatures along N5TV's proposed route due south of ARG for 0933 and 0948 were between -13 and -8 degrees Celsius, respectively.

The Area Forecast (FA) synopsis in part: At 0400 warm front extended from southern Georgia to low over central Mississippi with cold front continuing across southeastern Louisiana to western Gulf of Mexico. By 2300 low will be over eastern Tennessee with cold front trough western Georgia to eastern Gulf of Mexico. Upper trough from western Kansas to western Texas will move eastward to Indiana and Louisiana by 2300. The FA for northern half of Arkansas in part: ceiling overcast 1,000-1,500 feet; visibility 3-5 miles with rain, mist; occasional freezing rain, ice pellets; tops of clouds at 20,000 feet msl (FL20); from 1200 to 1500 the ceiling overcast 1,500-3,000 feet; isolated snow showers. The FA for southern half of Arkansas in part: ceiling overcast 1,200-1,500 feet; visibility 3-5 miles with mist; widely scattered rain showers; tops of clouds at 18,000 feet msl (FL18); from 0900 to 1200 ceiling overcast 1,500-2,500 feet.

The Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF's) and amendments for JRB (valid December 24, 0600 to December 25, 0600) in part reported the wind from 030 degrees at 12 knots gusting 20 knots, visibility greater than 6 miles, clouds overcast 1,000 feet (0600 to 1000, visibility 4 miles, light rain mist, clouds overcast 700 feet). From 1000, the wind from 360 degrees at 15 knots, visibility 4 miles, light drizzle, light snow, mist, clouds overcast 800 feet. Amendment in part: from 1000 to 1400 light rain, light snow, clouds broken 200 feet.

At the time of the accident, AIRMET SIERRA was valid for instrument flight rule (IFR) conditions for several states including Arkansas. AIRMET TANGO was valid for occasional moderate turbulence below 10,000 feet. AIRMET ZULU was valid for occasional moderate rime/mixed icing in cloud in precipitation between freezing level and 18,000 feet msl (FL 18).

Local authorities, who responded to the accident site, reported the ceiling 300 feet overcast, and the temperature 35 degrees Fahrenheit.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION

ARG is located on the 053 degree radial at 1.7 nautical miles from the ARG VORTAC (VHF navigation facility-omni directional course and distance information).

Runway 36 is served by a RNAV(GPS) approach. An initial approach fix (IAF) waypoint identified as GUBFO is 12 nautical miles from the runway threshold. The minimum approach altitude is 3,000 feet msl until reaching GUBFO. After the accident the RNAV(GPS) 36 approach was flight checked by the FAA. All components were found to be operating within prescribed tolerances. The runway end identifier lights (REIL) were found inoperative.

AERODROME INFORMATION

Walnut Ridge Regional Airport (ARG) is located approximately 4 miles northeast of Walnut Ridge, Arkansas. Walnut Ridge Regional is a non-towered airport with 3 concrete runways, including runway 18/36 (5,100 feet long and 150 feet wide). Runway 36 has medium intensity runway lights (MIRL). The airport elevation is 273 feet. The airport is serviced with non-precision instrument approach procedures including the RNAV/GPS 36 approach procedure with the approach facility as Memphis ARTCC. The Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) is 122.8 MHz.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The Global Positioning System (GPS) location of the accident site was latitude 35 degrees 51.42.8 minutes north; longitude 090 degrees 58.06.3 minutes west, in a vacant residential lot aligned on the south side with 30-foot pine trees. The distribution path was on a measured magnetic heading of 045 degrees for a distance of 72 feet. Approximately 15 feet from the base of the trees was the initial ground scar. The ground scar measurement of approximately 13 feet in length and contour width was consistent with the left wing impact. Two ground craters measured 7 feet wide by 7 feet long by 2 feet deep and 6.5 feet wide by 5 feet long by 2 feet deep, respectively. The dimensions of the craters were consistent with the left engine and right engine impact points, respectively. The main wreckage came to rest upright on a measured magnetic heading of 340 degrees.

The upper trunk of two trees was found separated and lying on the ground near the base of the trees, respectively. One tree exhibited scrapes, gouges, and missing bark along the trunk (approximately 16 feet agl) with small pieces of wing metal embedded into the trunk. Slash marks, consistent with propeller strikes, were found on two limbs on the ground near the base of the tree. The outboard portion (approximately 3 feet) of the left wing was found near the base of the tree. Pieces of fiber, consistent with wood, were found embedded into the crushed metal of the wing, and the deformation (leading edge crushed upward and aft to the rear spar) of the wing was consistent with the diameter (approximately 10 inches) of the tree trunk. The tree deformation, ground scars, and craters, were consistent with a near vertical impact. The impact sequence and the post accident fire destroyed the cockpit, cabin, and fuselage. There were no complete systems found intact at the accident site.

Impact and thermal deformation of the flap actuators precluded a determination of the position of the flaps. The position of the main landing gear right hand extension rod and the nose landing gear rod were consistent with the gear in the retracted position. The airplane was recovered and transported to a secure location, for further examination under the supervision of the NTSB IIC.

Flight control continuity was confirmed to the cockpit. The continuity of the aileron cables was complete from the forward ends at the cockpit chain to the aileron actuator linkage point in the wing, respectively. The aileron (4) counterweights were found at the accident sight. The flaps and ailerons were found attached to the wing, respectively. Rudder cables were continuous from the cockpit to the empennage rear rudder control linkage. Elevator cables were found continuous from the front wing spar to the elevator linkage in the empennage of the airplane. The elevator push-pull rods were found separated at the forward pivot fitting with physical evidence consistent of 45 degree shear lips indicative consistent with overload at the separation points. Thermal deformation precluded a determination for the forward elevator linkages. Trim cables were found continuous forward and aft with all chains attached at the respective positions. A single throw-over type control column/yoke for elevator and aileron control was found at the accident sight. The rudder trim was measured at 4 inches, elevator trim 1 ΒΌ inch, and the aileron trim at 1 inch. According to the manufacturer's representative, the measurements equate to 5 degrees tab left rudder trim, 10 degrees tab down elevator trim, and neutral aileron trim, respectively.

Portions of the cockpit door, cabin door, and the forward portion of the utility door were found separated from the airframe. Impact damage of the doors and frames was consistent with the door pins in the locked position prior to the impact sequence. The cockpit seats were found separated from the airplane. The left front seat back and a fastened seat belt buckle were located approximately 3 feet aft of the inboard right wing. No evidence of shoulder harness installation was found.

Impact and thermal deformation precluded a determination of the status of the fluid supply tank and operational status of the anti-ice system. Impact and thermal deformation precluded a determination of the operational status of the Janitrol heater. The Ameri-King, Model AK-3450, S/N 450131, emergency locator transmitter (ELT), was found in the armed position. The integrity of the wet wing fuel system was compromised during the impact sequence and the post accident fire. Fuel lines were found attached at the fuel selector valves. Both fuel selector valves were found toward the off position; however, the left and right fuel selector cables exhibited physical evidence of displacement during the impact sequence.

The TCM left engine model IO-520-CB, serial number 299465-R was found at the accident site. Physical evidence of engine ice protection electro thermal fuel vent heater installation was found. The left McCauley two bladed propeller model D2AF34C30NP, blade design 878FF-0, blade S/N C94875 and C94882, hub S/N 710536, was found adjacent to the engine and separated from the crankshaft. The propeller spinner was found crushed around the hub with the blades attached in the hub. One propeller blade was straight, and one blade exhibited "S" bending. The left propeller governor spring and arm components were found near the engine in an area of impact and thermal deformation. The Electro systems 24 volt alternator, P/N ALT-9522, S/N B102671 exhibited impact damage. The right magneto, TCM model S6RN-1225, S/N FO2AA37R, P/N BL-349350-5A, and the left magneto, TCM model S6RN-1225, S/N FO2AA349R, P/N BL-349350-4A exhibited impact damage. When rotated by hand, both magnetos sparked at all post. Spark plugs, Champion P/N RHB32E sparked exhibited wear consistent with normal combustion, according to the Champion wear guide, and the plugs (except #6 top and #4 bottom which was found broken at the accident site) produced spark when tested. Impact and thermal deformation precluded rotation of the fuel pump, TCM P/N 646212-16A3, S/N 802AA309R. The fuel pump drive was found intact. Fuel manifold, TCM P/N 631427-2922, S/N CO2AA296R, inlet line, the #1 injector line at the manifold valve, and the #1 injector line at the fuel injector exhibited impact damage. The injectors (#2, #3, #4, #5, #6) and lines were found intact. Throttle body/metering unit, P/N 653377A2, S/N A029AA281R, exhibited impact and thermal deformation. Exhaust and intake tubes were crushed. The oil sump was crushed upward against the bottom of the crankcase. The oil filter was removed, opened, and exhibited thermal deformation. From the oil crankcase, an oil sample was taken for further examination. The left engine was equipped with General Aviation Modifications, Inc., (GAMI) fuel injectors (Supplemental Type certificate) STC # SE09217SC. Left engine GAMI fuel injector part numbers per cylinder are: #1 GA -168, #2 GA-168, #3 GM-131, #4 GM-151, #5 GF-151, and #6 GF-151.

Cylinder #6, P/N 655469, push rods were found bent and cooling fins crushed. The #6 cylinder was removed from the engine for further examination, and no anomalies were found that would preclude operation of the cylinder prior to the accident. The continuity check was performed on the engine by manually rotating the crankshaft. Continuity was confirmed from the crankshaft to the rear accessory case gears, and thumb compression and valve action was noted at cylinders #1 through #5, piston movement at cylinder #6, and movement at the accessory drive gears. Portions of the accessory drive case were found destroyed by thermal deformation. The cylinders were examined with a bore-scope and no discrepancies were found. The model TCM starter, P/N 646275-1, S/N P-080250, rotated by hand. The adapter, where the starter was mounted on the engine, exhibited impact and thermal damage. The vacuum pump, P/N 242CW, S/N 3743, drive coupling exhibited impact and thermal deformation, the drive coupling would not turn by hand, and the vanes were intact.

The TCM right engine model IO-520-CB, serial number 299466-R was found at the accident site. Physical evidence of engine ice protection electro thermal fuel vent heater installation was found. The right McCauley two blade propeller model D2AF34C30NP, blade design 878FF-0, blade S/N's K94608 and C94865, hub S/N 713000, was found separated from the propeller flange. The propeller spinner was found crushed around the hub with one blade attached in the hub, and one blade in the impact crater. The blade found at the hub exhibited "S" bending, and the blade in the impact crater was straight. The propeller governor was destroyed by the impact sequence and thermal deformation. The Electro systems 24 volt alternator, P/N ALT-9622, S/N C110628, exhibited impact damage. The right magneto, TCM model S6RN-1225, S/N FO299369R, P/N BL-349350-5A, exhibited impact damage. The left magneto, TCM model S6RN-1225, S/N FO21A251R, P/N BL-349350-4A, exhibited impact damage and was found separated from the engine. Both magnetos sparked at all post when rotated by hand. The top spark plugs, Champion P/N RHB32E, exhibited wear consistent with normal combustion, according to the Champion wear guide, and the plugs produced spark when tested. The fuel pump, TCM P/N 655243-2, S/N AF02BA018R rotated by hand, and the fuel pump drive was found intact. The fuel manifold, TCM P/N 631427-2A22, S/N CO2BA016R, inlet fitting, the outlet fitting, and the #1 injector line exhibited impact damage and were found separated from the manifold valve. The fuel injectors were found intact. Throttle body/metering unit, P/N 653377A2, S/N A02BA020R, exhibited impact and thermal deformation. Exhaust and intake tubes were crushed. The oil sump was crushed upward toward the bottom of the crankcase. The oil filter was removed, opened, and exhibited thermal deformation. The right engine was equipped with General Aviation Modifications, Inc., (GAMI) fuel injectors STC # SE09217SC. Right engine GAMI fuel injector part number per cylinder are: #1 GA-168, #2 GA-168, #3 GA-151, #4 GA-151, #5 GF-143, and #6 GF-143.

The continuity check was performed on the engine by manually rotating the crankshaft. Continuity was confirmed from the propeller flange to the rear accessory case gears, and thumb compression and valve action was noted at cylinders #1 through #6. Portions of the accessory drive case were found destroyed by thermal deformation. The cylinders were examined with a lighted bore-scope and no discrepancies were found. The starter, TCM model P/N 646275-1, S/N P-040228, rotated by hand. The adapter, where the starter was mounted on the engine, exhibited impact and fire damage. The vacuum pump, P/N 242CW, S/N 3745, drive coupling exhibited impact and thermal deformation and the drive coupling rotated by hand.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The autopsy was performed by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the Arkansas Crime Laboratory at Little Rock, Arkansas. The cause of death was determined as blunt force injuries and extensive thermal body burns.

The FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute's (CAMI) Forensic Toxicological and Accident Research Center at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, examined the pilot's specimens taken by the medical examiner. According to CAMI, the pilot's toxicology showed no indication of alcohol or performance-impairing drugs at the time of the accident.

TEST AND RESEARCH

The propellers were shipped to the manufacturer's facility in Vandalia, Ohio, where it was examined and disassembled on March 20, 2003, under the supervision of an NTSB investigator. Both propellers exhibited physical evidence (blade bending and twisting) consistent with high power (at or near the low pitch range) and rotation (symmetrical energy) at impact.

The fuel manifolds lines, fuel injectors, fuel pumps, and throttle bodies were shipped to the FAA Manufacturing Inspection District Office (MIDO), at Bethany, Oklahoma. Impact damage precluded flow testing of the fuel system components. On January 22, 2003, the examination and teardown of the fuel manifolds was conducted at Aircraft Accessories, Tulsa, Oklahoma, under the supervision of the FAA. The inlet fittings in the fuel manifolds from both engines, the #1 fuel injector from the left engine, and the inlet fitting on the fuel pump from the right engine exhibited impact damage consistent with overload. The fuel pump from the left engine drive coupling was intact; however, thermal deformation precluded rotation of the fuel pump. The fuel pump from the right engine rotated and the drive coupling was intact. Teardown of the fuel manifolds did not reveal any discrepancies that would have precluded operation of the fuel manifold, fuel pumps, or throttle bodies from either engine.

On January 23, 2003, the fuel injectors were flow tested at the GAMI, Inc., manufacturer's facility in Ada, Oklahoma, under the supervision of the FAA. The flow test readings were in the acceptable range except the #5 injector from the left engine. The flow reading for the #5 fuel injector (left engine) was 24.27 (acceptable range 24.3 to 24.8). No debris was found in any of the fuel injectors. The impact damage precluded flow testing of the #1 fuel injector from the left engine.

The alternators were shipped to the NTSB office in Arlington, Texas. On February 4, 2003, the alternators were examined and disassembled at Select Aircraft Services, Inc., Lancaster, Texas, under the supervision of the NTSB IIC. Both alternators exhibited impact damage which precluded rotation of the alternator drive. Examination of the alternators did not reveal any anomalies that would have prevented operation within specifications prior to the impact.

The autopilot servos were shipped to the NTSB office in Arlington, Texas. Impact and thermal deformation precluded a detail functional testing of the autopilot servos. When an electrical current was applied to the motor, the autopilot servos exhibited movement in both directions.

The left engine oil sample was shipped to Aviation Laboratories, 910 Maria Street, Kenner, Louisiana 70062, 504-469-6751 for analysis. No discrepancies in the oil composition were found.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Beechcraft Baron 58 POH/AFM Section IV in part: Propeller anti-ice (fluid MIL-F-5566 flow) system designed to PREVENT the formation of ice. Always turn the system ON before entering icing conditions.

a. PREFLIGHT
(1) Check the quantity in reservoir
(2) Check slinger ring and lines for obstructions
(3) Check propeller boots for damage

b. IN FLIGHT
(1) Prop Anti-ice Switch - ON
(2) Anti-ice Quantity Indicator - MONITOR

Beechcraft Baron 58 POH/AFM Section X in part: minimum speed in icing conditions is 130 knots (KIAS).

On December 3, 2001, the FAA issued Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2001-23-17 which applies to certain GARMIN GNS-340 units that are installed on aircraft. The FAA received information that GNS 430 installations have received electrical noise between 1 and 3 volts alternating current (AC) peak-peak (induced into the GNS 430 CDI input) from other items installed on the aircraft. This high level of noise causes an undesirable oscillation of the CDI outputs, which results in inaccurate course deviation displays in the GNS 430 unit's CDI/HSI. Thermal destruction of the electrical system and cockpit components precluded a determination of the operational status of the GNS-430 unit at the time of the accident; however, the FAA checklist for instructions for continued airworthiness for major alterations under the field approval process for the installation of Garmin GMA-340 and Garmin GNS-430, AIRWORTHINESS LIMITATION SECTION states: GPS is not approved for IFR.

The airplane wreckage was released to the owner's representative.

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