ATL03FA010
ATL03FA010

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 25, 2002, at 1239 eastern standard time, a Cessna R182, N4629S, registered to and operated by Duboy and Fisher Incorporated, collided with the ground while being radar vectored for approach into Piedmont Triad International Airport, Greensboro, North Carolina. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91 with an instrument flight plan filed. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The private pilot and his two passengers were fatally injured. The flight departed Bartow Municipal Airport, Bartow, Florida, on October 25, 2003, at 0809.

Review of the transcription of voice recordings revealed, at 0809 the airplane contact Tampa Approach airborne off of Bartow Airport, Florida on an instrument cross-country flight to Smith Reynolds Airport, Winston Salem, North Carolina. At 1117, the pilot made initial contact to Greensboro approach control. Approach control cleared the pilot for the ILS runway 33 approach. At 1134, the pilot radioed he was having an emergency; he stated that he was totally disorientated. He was instructed to climb to 6,000 feet to get the airplane on top of the overcast. The pilot was given a radar vector to re-intercept the runway 33- localizer and cleared to descend to 2,500 feet. At 1147, approach control advised the pilot that he was off the final approach course at 2,700 feet. At this point the controller issued the pilot instructions to climb to 4000 feet. The pilot was reissued a heading to intercept the runway 33-localizer. At 1208, approach control advised the pilot that he was off course and issued climb instructions to 3,000 feet.

At 1210, the pilot advised approach control that his fuel status was low. He advised approach control that he had approximately an hour and a half of fuel. Approach control advised the pilot that he would be brought over to Piedmont Triad International Airport, Greensboro for an Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR) approach. At 1217, the pilot was asked by approach control if his instruments were working properly, he stated they were working properly, but wanted approach control to give him headings information. The controller also issued the pilot recent weather information for Greensboro and Raleigh. The pilot advised approach control that he wanted to go to Raleigh, and expressed his concern with his fuel supply and stated he wasn't sure if he had an hour remaining. He asked approach control to tell him what was easier and faster. Approach control advised the pilot to plan for runway 23 at Greensboro.

At 1231, approach control advised the pilot that he would be given the ILS runway 23 approach and provided with recommended altitudes. During the approach to runway 23 control advised the pilot that he was left on the final approach course and instructed him to maintain 2,500, turn 10-degrees to the right to re-intercept the course. At 1239:37, the pilot responded, "out of control I am upside down we're going to die-oh my god", this was the last transmission received from the pilot. The airplane collided with trees and the ground in a heavily wooded area near the outer marker.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land, and instrument ratings. The date of issuance of the pilot's instrument rating was November 24, 1997. The pilot reported 91 hours in this make & model airplane at the time of his rating application. Review of the Federal Aviation Administration records showed the pilot had a total flight time of 213 hours. The pilot's flight logbooks were not recovered. The pilot held a third class medical certificate, dated April 12, 2001, valid when wearing corrective glasses for near vision.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

A Lycoming O-540-J3C5D engine powered N4629S, a Cessna R182. Review of the aircraft logbooks revealed that the last annual inspection was completed on June 7, 2002. The last recorded altimeter system test was on February 28, 2001. The transponder test was recorded on April 25, 2001.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1254 weather observation for Piedmont Triad International Airport, Greensboro, reported wind zero four zero at seven, visibility one half statue mile, mist, one hundred overcast, temperature 11 degrees, dew point 11 degrees, altimeter 30.22 inches.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Piedmont Triad International Airport has an elevation of 926 feet MSL. It has two runways, runway 14-32 and 5-23. At the time of the accident runway 23 was in use. Instrument approach minima for the S-ILS 23 approach, required a decision height (mean sea level) of 1,090 feet, runway visibility 1,800 feet, and a ceiling of 200 feet and 1/2 statue visibility.


WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Examination of the wreckage site revealed the airplane came to rest in a heavily wooded and swampy area near the outer marker. The main fuselage was buried in approximately 10 feet of mud and water in a nose down attitude with the horizontal and vertical stabilizers protruding above the ground. The trees at the accident site displayed freshly broken branches. The accident site was approximately 25 feet in diameter. All flight control surfaces were located at the site.

Both wing assemblies were separated from the fuselage. The flight control cables were still attached to the respective flight control system. Flight control cables were traced from the flight controls in the cockpit to all flight control surfaces. All flight control cable separations were cut during the wreckage recovery operation. The landing gear was found in the extended position. The flap jackscrew measurements revealed the flaps were in the "up" position.

Examination of the fuel system disclosed that the fuel tanks were breached. A blue liquid substance was drained from the mechanical fuel pump, and had the smell of aviation fuel. Blue discolorations were discovered on the flaps.

The engine assembly was buried approximately 10-feet in mud. The engine separated from the firewall. Examination of engine assembly revealed no evidence of mechanical failure or malfunction. The propeller assembly was attached to the crankshaft flange. The fuel servo was not recovered from the accident site.

The Vacuum pump was attached to the engine accessory housing. The internal examination of the vacuum pump vanes and rotor revealed that they were broken. The case and end plate of the vacuum pump exhibited scoring. The airspeed indicator, encoding altimeter, and vertical speed indicator sustained crush damage. Communication and navigational instruments sustained crush damage.

Examination of the crush damaged turn and bank indicator revealed no evidence of a mechanical failure or malfunction. Disassembly of the turn and bank coordinator revealed scoring on the rotor assembly. Examination of the crush damaged directional gyro revealed no evidence of a mechanical failure or malfunction. Disassembly of the directional gyro revealed scoring on the rotor assembly. Examination of the attitude gyro revealed no evidence of a mechanical failure or malfunction. Disassembly of the attitude gyro revealed scoring on the rotor assembly. Examination of the electrical attitude gyro revealed no evidence of a mechanical failure.


MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Office of the chief medical examiner, Chapel Hill, North Carolina performed the pathological diagnoses of the pilot. The cause of death was blunt force trauma. The Forensic Toxicology Research Section, Federal Aviation Administration, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma performed postmortem toxicology of specimens from the pilot. The results were negative for carbon monoxide, cyanide, and ethanol. Fluoxtine and NorFluoxtine were detected in the kidneys and the liver.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The wreckage of N4629S was released to AIG Aviation on November 14, 2003.

Winston-Salem Smith Reynolds Airport has an elevation of 970 feet MSL. It has two runways, runway 4-22 and 15-33. At the time of the accident runway 33 was in use. Instrument approach minima for the S-ILS 33 approach, required a decision height (mean sea level) of 1,141 feet, runway visibility 2,400 feet, and a ceiling of 200 feet with 1/2 statue mile visibility.





















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