NYC02LA052
NYC02LA052

On January 26, 2002, at 1602 eastern standard time, a Socata TB-9, N28239, was substantially damaged when it overran the runway while landing at Marlboro Airport, Marlboro, Massachusetts. The certificated private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the business flight. No flight plan had been filed for the flight that was conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.

According to the pilot, the flight originated from Westchester County Airport, White Plains, New York. The en route phase was without incident. Arriving in the Marlboro area, he checked the winds at a nearby airport, and observed the windsock at Marlboro Airport. He estimated the wind was a 90 degree crosswind from the left at 7 to 10 knots. The wind was not steady. The first two approaches to runway 32 terminated in a go-around due to excessive speed. On the third approach, he was more aware of his airspeed and was on his desired speed as he passed over the trees. However, when he pushed the nose down, he thought the airplane may have gained about 10 knots, although he was not certain of the actual speed increase. He thought the airplane touched down about 1/3 of the way down the runway; however, the brakes were not immediately effective. Around midfield there was more weight on the main landing gear wheels, and the brakes became effective. The pilot was unable to stop the airplane on the runway and struck a chain link fence located about 10 feet beyond the departure end of the runway.

The pilot reported that he had never landed at Marlboro before. However, he did reference various sources to gain information about the airport prior to making the flight. He also checked the amount of runway required for landing and found there was sufficient runway. Further, the pilot reported that although he had made short field landings before, and stopped the airplane well within the distance of the available runway at Marlboro, he had never actually landed on a runway that short. Additionally, he did not raise the wing flaps after landing.

According to an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a witness reported that the airplane touched down about mid-field, and then departed the runway at the end. Further, the FAA inspector reported that there were skid marks for about 400 feet on the runway, which terminated at the location where the airplane came to rest. When he examined the airplane, he observed that the wings of the airplane had struck the poles on the fence and crushed the leading edge rearward. In addition, there were areas on the wings where the rivets had popped, and the wing skin was no longer held in place. There were creases in the wing skin on the left wing, and the spar was bent.

According to data from the FAA, the runway was 1,682 feet long, 50 feet wide, and had an asphalt surface.

According to the landing performance chart for the Socata TV-9, at maximum gross weight, under the atmospheric conditions reported, the airplane would have required 1,423 feet to clear a 50 foot obstacle at the end of the runway, and stop on the remaining runway.

The pilot reported his total flight experience as about 98 hours, with 96 hours in make and model. He had received his private pilot certificate on December 4, 2001, and had logged 36 hours in the preceding 90 days, including 20 hours as pilot-in-command.

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