FTW01LA185
FTW01LA185

On August 19, 2001, at 1150 central daylight time, a Beech A-36TC, single-engine airplane, N1852Z, sustained substantial damage when it struck terrain after takeoff from runway 32 at Hicks Airfield (T67) near Fort Worth, Texas. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airline transport pilot and two passengers were not injured, and the pilot rated passenger received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan was not filed. The personal flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that the aircraft "departed runway 32 at Hicks Airfield, and approximately 4-5 seconds after rotation, the airplane had a partial power loss." The pilot performed the emergency landing procedures, and the aircraft came to rest beyond the departure end of the runway. The pilot and passengers exited the aircraft. An on-ground fire was extinguished by the pilot.

The FAA inspector, who responded to the site, located the aircraft on the railroad tracks. The propeller and engine were separated from the airframe. The propeller blades were loose in the hub, and the blades exhibited striations, scrapes, and gouges. The outboard portion of the right wing leading edge was crushed upward and aft. The outboard portion of the left wing was bent upward. The rudder and the stabilizer trim tab were separated from the airframe. The outboard portion of the right horizontal stabilizer was bent downward. The aft fuselage was crushed and buckled upward. The mixture, propeller, and throttle controls were found full forward at the cockpit control quadrant.

A JP Instrument, EDM-700, engine monitoring instrument was removed from the accident aircraft by the FAA inspector, and subsequently shipped to JP Instruments, Costa Mesa, California. The EDM-700 contained data recorded on 10 flights starting on July 14, 2001. The data recorded included exhaust gas temperatures (EGTs) and cylinder head temperatures (CHTs) for each cylinder. Further, the data recorded included the turbocharger outlet temperature (T1) and the differential between the highest and lowest EGT. Representatives at JP Instruments retrieved the stored data which they forwarded to the FAA inspector.

The data were examined by FAA inspectors, NTSB investigators, and the engine representative. Subsequently, the data was forwarded to Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM), Mobile, Alabama, for examination by the engine manufacturer personnel. The data indicated the total time from start-up to impact was approximately 8 minutes 40 seconds. According to the manufacturer representative, the data is consistent with "all six cylinders operating normally for the 8 minutes and 40 seconds from start-up to impact." The representative further stated that the cylinder head temperatures (CHTs) recorded are also consistent with "normal operation, showing an increase over time." The data from the previous flights showed similar EGTs and T1 behavior.

The Beech A-36TC, serial number (S/N) EA-266, airplane was manufactured in 1977. A Continental TSIO-520-UB(2) engine, S/N 515842, was installed. Available maintenance records revealed that the engine was removed, disassembled, and reinstalled in May 1995 at an accumulated time of 1,032.6 hours. Also in May 1995, the magnetos were removed, overhauled, and reinstalled. A McCauley propeller, model 3AF32C76-S-M, was installed. On June 20, 1996, the turbocharger was removed, overhauled, and reinstalled. On June 15, 1997, the Shaden fuel flow transducer was installed. General Aviation Modifications, Inc., fuel injector nozzles were installed on September 22, 1999. The JP Instruments unit was installed on October 5, 1999. On July 1, 2001, the last annual inspection was performed at an accumulated aircraft time of 1,435.88 hours. The maintenance logbook entry for the inspection stated in part: Removed gami injectors and cleaned and reinstalled in correct cylinders, using new compression seals (P/N 633958-3), rubber washers (P/N 640612), and injector O-rings (P/N 630979). Installed 12 new Champion spark plugs P/N RHB 32E.

The engine was examined at Lancaster, Texas, under the supervision of a FAA inspector. Continuity was confirmed to all of the cylinders and to the rear of the engine. The engine driven fuel pump (P/N 639508-9, S/N G288109B), was removed and retained by the FAA inspector for further examination.

The fuel pump was examined at TCM, on February 19, 2002, under the supervision of an NTSB investigator. According to the engine representative, the fuel pump "functioned normally on the flow bench. It appeared the fuel pump was capable of delivering fuel to the other fuel system components."

At 1053, the weather observation facility at Fort Worth Alliance Airport (AFW), located 4 nautical miles northeast of the accident site, reported clear skies, wind calm, temperature 34 degrees Celsius, and dew point 18 degrees Celsius. The altimeter setting was 29.99 inches of Mercury.

At 1153, the weather observation facility at AFW reported clear skies, wind 190 degrees (160 variable 240) at 7 knots, temperature 35 degrees Celsius, and dew point 20 degrees Celsius. The altimeter setting was 29.97 inches of Mercury.

At 1053, the weather observation facility at Fort Worth Meacham Airport (FTW), located 6 nautical miles south of the accident site, reported clear skies, wind 190 degrees at 6 knots, temperature 32 degrees Celsius, and dew point 19 degrees Celsius. The altimeter setting was 30.01 inches of Mercury.

At 1153, the weather observation facility at FTW reported clear skies, wind 210 at 6 knots, temperature 33 degrees Celsius, and dew point 19 degrees Celsius. The altimeter reading was 29.99 inches of Mercury.

The aircraft was released to the owner's representative.

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