FTW00FA154A
FTW00FA154A

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 25, 2000, at 1812 central daylight time, a Cessna 152 single-engine airplane, N45973, and a Cessna 182L single-engine airplane, N974SR, collided in-flight near Noble, Oklahoma. The Cessna 152 was registered to and operated by Airman Flight School, Inc., of Norman, Oklahoma, and the Cessna 182 was registered to Mad Max Aerobatics, Inc., of Sadler, Texas, and operated by the pilot. The private pilot, sole occupant of the Cessna 152, and the commercial pilot, sole occupant of the Cessna 182, received fatal injuries. Both aircraft were destroyed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and flight plans were not filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flights. The pilot of the Cessna 152, on a local solo instructional flight, departed the University of Oklahoma Westheimer Airport (OUN), Norman, Oklahoma, approximately 1756. The pilot of the Cessna 182, on a personal cross-country flight destined for Sherman, Texas, departed OUN, approximately 1804.

According to the Director of Operations at Airman Flight School, the pilot of the Cessna 152 was scheduled to fly the airplane from 1700 until 1900, in the local training area, to practice commercial flight maneuvers.

According to radar data provided by the Oklahoma City Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON), after departure from OUN, the first radar return of the Cessna 152 was at 1756:17. At 1807:31, approximately 12 nautical miles (nm) southeast of the departure airport, the data depicted the start of a ground track resembling figure-eights. The altitude could not be determined for the Cessna 152.

After departure from OUN, the first radar return of the Cessna 182 was at 1804.59. The data depicted the airplane, with a 1200 beacon code, moving in a southeasterly direction toward its intended destination. The following table includes time and altitude for the Cessna 182:

TIME ALTITUDE (feet agl) 1804:59 1,300 1806:26 2,200 1807:31 2,100 1809:04 2,000 1810:31 2,000 1811:41 2,000

The last radar return from the Cessna 152 was at 1811:45, and the last radar return from the Cessna 182 was at 1811:41. At the time of the last radar returns, the targets were about 12 nm southeast of the departure airport, and the Cessna 152 was approximately 1/4 nm southeast of the Cessna 182. The Cessna 152 was heading to the west, and the Cessna 182 was heading to the southeast.

Witnesses, located approximately two statute miles from the accident site, stated that they heard a "boom," looked up, and saw the two airplanes falling next to each other. The witnesses called 911, and then responded to the accident location.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot of the Cessna 152 received a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating on April 4, 1998, and obtained an airplane instrument rating on May 4, 2000. He was issued a second-class medical certificate with no limitations on February 3, 2000. He had accumulated 170.1 hours total flight time prior to the accident. The pilot was enrolled in a commercial flight training program at Airman Flight School.

The pilot of the Cessna 182 received a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating on August 26, 1976, and obtained a commercial certificate on October 13, 1991. He was issued a second-class medical certificate with a limitation to wear corrective lenses on March 31, 1999. It could not be determined if he was wearing corrective lenses at the time of the accident. According to the pilot's logbook, the pilot's most recent biennial flight review was completed on September 2, 1999. He had accumulated 2,979.2 hours total flight time prior to the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The 1978-model, red on white, Cessna 152, (serial number 15282969), was a high wing, single-engine airplane, with fixed tricycle landing gear. The airplane was powered by a 115-horsepower Lycoming O-235-L2C engine (serial number L-15540-15), and was equipped with a 2-blade McCauley fixed pitch propeller. According to the airframe and engine logbooks, the airplane underwent its most recent annual and 100-hour inspections on May 12, 1999, at a total aircraft time of 8,506 hours, and on April 26, 2000, at a total aircraft time of 9,106.3 hours, respectively. As of April 26, 2000, the engine had accumulated 8,915 total hours, and 2,873.4 hours since a major overhaul. The tachometer was found at the accident site and indicated 9,196.8 hours.

The 1968-model, red on white, Cessna 182L, (serial number 18258925), was a high wing, single-engine airplane, with fixed tricycle landing gear. The airplane was powered by a 230-horsepower Continental O-470-R engine (serial number 212452R), and was equipped with a 2-blade McCauley constant speed propeller. According to the airframe logbook, the airplane underwent its most recent annual inspection on January 11, 2000, at a total time of 7,103.0 hours. The engine, at the time of the annual inspection, had accumulated a total time of 1,383 hours since major overhaul.

A review of the airframe and engine records for both airplanes by the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC) did not reveal evidence of uncorrected defects.

METEORLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1753, the reported weather conditions at the Will Rogers World Airport (OKC), located approximately 20 miles northwest of the accident site, were wind from 080 degrees at 13 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 2,700 feet msl, scattered clouds at 5,000 feet msl, temperature 79 degrees Fahrenheit, dew point 73 degrees Fahrenheit, and an altimeter setting of 29.73 inches of Mercury.

According to the U.S. Naval Observatory, at 1815, the position of the sun at Noble, Oklahoma, was 26.19 degrees above the horizon and 285.4 degrees azimuth. Sunset was at 2034.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The Cessna 182 accident site location was recorded by a global positioning system (GPS) receiver at latitude 35 degrees 05 minutes north, and longitude 097 degrees 22 minutes west, at an elevation of 1,075 feet msl. The Cessna 152 came to rest inverted approximately 1,100 feet northwest of the Cessna 182. The left wing and pilot's seat from the Cessna 182 came to rest between the wreckages of the two aircraft. The Cessna 182's left main landing gear and the Cessna 152's propeller were not located.

The spinner tip from the Cessna 152 was found embedded in the left main landing gear attachment point of the Cessna 182. The Cessna 182's left wing strut was severed 9 inches from the fuselage attachment point. The separation appeared to be a clean cut, perpendicular to the length of the strut.

The Cessna 152 cockpit/cabin roof was crushed inward. The empennage was partially separated and remained connected to the fuselage only via the rudder and elevator cables. Flight control continuity was established for the ailerons, rudder, elevator, and elevator trim systems. The left wing was attached to the airplane and displaced forward. The right wing, lying adjacent to the main wreckage, was separated at the wing attach points. The right wing strut was attached to the fuselage and separated from the wing structure. The flap actuator was measured and determined to be in the retracted position. The fuel selector was found in the ON position. The flight and engine instruments were destroyed. The throttle, mixture, and carburetor heat controls were found in the full forward position. The navigation lights and rotating beacon switches were found in the ON position.

The Cessna 182's cabin/fuselage was consumed by fire. The right wing remained attached to the charred fuselage. Flight control continuity was established for the right aileron from the bellcrank to the wing root. The left wing came to rest approximately 500 feet northwest of the C-182's main wreckage. The empennage was detached from the fuselage and fragmented throughout the accident site. The left horizontal stabilizer was compressed chordwise aft with the elevator detached. The vertical stabilizer and rudder were found detached from each other and the fuselage. The engine, flight instruments, and electrical switches were destroyed by fire. The engine was attached to the airframe and was found embedded in the ground. The propeller was attached to the engine and exhibited "S" bending.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Autopsies for both pilots were performed by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Toxicological tests for the pilots were performed by the FAA's Civil Aeromedical Medical Institute (CAMI) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Cessna 182 pilot test results were negative for alcohol and drugs. The Cessna 152 pilot tested positive for 228 (mg/dl) glucose detected in vitreous. According Dr. Canfield from CAMI, elevated glucose levels can be caused by diabetes mellitus, emergency medical treatment, strenuous exercise, shock, or burns.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The wreckage of both airplanes was released to their respective owner's representative.

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