CHI99LA279
CHI99LA279

On August 8, 1999, at 1615 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28- 161, N2366W, was substantially damaged when it collided with parked airplanes following a loss of directional control. The loss of control occurred during a takeoff roll on runway 11 (3,800 feet by 100 feet) at the Schaumburg Regional Airport, Schaumburg, Illinois. The certified flight instructor (CFI) was not injured and the dual student received minor injuries. The 14 CFR Part 91 local dual instructional flight was operating in visual meteorological conditions without a flight plan. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The CFI reported the student had the left brake applied as he began to add power for takeoff. The airplane began veering to the left side of the runway. She reported she told the student to maintain the centerline, at which time he took his foot off the brake and applied full power. The CFI reported the airplane "...rolled off the runway bounced over a ditch and onto the ramp." She stated she reduced the power to idle and applied brakes, but was unable to stop the airplane. She reported the dual student had both feet on the rudder pedals and she was unable to maneuver the airplane to avoid other airplanes on the ramp.

Post accident inspection by an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration West Chicago Flight Standards District Office revealed the airplane began to veer to the left side of the runway approximately 450 feet into the takeoff roll. The airplane departed the left side of the runway after traveling an additional 150 feet. It then crossed through a grass area where it cleared a ditch. It continued over the parallel taxiway and onto the ramp where it contacted N3228W, a Beech Bonanza, and N13BR, a Piper Apache. When contacted, the Piper Apache was pushed rearward into N82AW, a T-28. The three of these airplanes were parked and unoccupied at the time.

The CFI reported that this was the first time she had flown with this particular student. The student had approximately 10 hours of flight time.

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