CHI93LA304
CHI93LA304

On August 2, 1993, at 1200 central daylight time, a Piper PA31P, N25TC, piloted by the Commercial pilot/registered owner, sustained substantial damage during the forced landing after a loss of engine power shortly after takeoff at Coffeyville, Kansas. The commercial pilot and one passenger reported no injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight, no flight plan was filed. The local flight operated under 14 CFR Part 91, and originated from Coffeyville approximately 1159.

The pilot described his preflight, taxi and run-up procedures in detail, and there was no evidence of malfunction. He stated he originally observed winds out of 150 degrees at 10 knots, and planned to depart Runway 17. As he started the takeoff roll on Runway 17, he noted the wind had shifted to the northeast. He aborted the takeoff and taxied to "...within 1,000 feet of the south end of Runway 17..." where he turned around and checked the wind. The pilot observed winds out of 010 to 030 degrees at 10 to 15 knots and initiated the takeoff roll on Runway 35.

The pilot reported: "I applied power slowly up to 30" (inches)...reached 80 MPH. I checked all lights above the pilot seats (fuel and pneumatic, pressure, electrical system, all were OK.) Checked airspeed, 85 MPH, full throttle to 45" (inches). The aircraft pulled to the right. I applied left rudder, checked airspeed 95-100 MPH. Aircraft became airborne." The pilot estimated the airplane was about 20 feet in the air when the right engine surged and appeared to overspeed. The airplane banked to the right and the right wing dropped, striking the ground. The pilot stated at that time he had no control of the airplane, which did a 180 degree turn and skidded backwards. The airplane came to a stop about 350 feet from the point of initial contact.

Postaccident investigation revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction. The pilot stated he did not observe any warning lights or other cockpit indication of a problem with the right engine or propeller. The FAA Inspector's statement and field notes are appended.

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