NTSB Identification: WPR12LA324
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 20, 2012 in Medford, OR
Aircraft: Hawker Beechcraft G58, registration: N7122T
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 20, 2012, about 1145 Pacific daylight time, a Hawker Beechcraft G58, N7122T, was substantially damaged when it veered off the runway, and struck a sign and a ditch during landing at Rogue Valley International Airport – Medford (MRF), Medford, Oregon. Both the pilot/owner and his passenger were uninjured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan was filed for the flight.

According to the pilot, he based the airplane at Palm Springs International Airport (PSP) Palm Springs, California. He departed PSP about 0839, conducted the flight under visual flight rules, and reported that the flight and approach were unremarkable. He reported that he used 85 knots as his final approach speed, and full flaps for the landing. When the airplane touched down on runway 32, it immediately went "out of control," and swerved to the right and left. It exited the right (northeast) side of the runway, struck a runway distance sign, and then a ditch. All three landing gear were fracture-separated from the airplane during the accident sequence. The airplane came to rest upright, approximately 4,000 feet down runway 32, and 500 feet from the centerline. In his initial statement to first responders, the pilot reported that he believed that there was a malfunction of the rudder control system. The airplane was recovered by a maintenance facility on the airport, and was retained for additional examination.

FAA information indicated that the pilot held a private pilot certificate, with airplane single engine land, airplane multi engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued in March 2011. According to the pilot, he had a total flight experience of about 850 hours, including about 45 hours in the accident airplane make and model. The airplane was manufactured in 2011, and had a total time in service of approximately 50 hours.

The MFR 1153 automated weather observation included variable winds at 4 knots; visibility 10 miles; clear skies; temperature 24 degrees C; dew point 12 degrees C; and an altimeter setting of 30.15 inches of mercury.

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