NTSB Identification: NYC05FA021.
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Accident occurred Wednesday, November 24, 2004 in Paeonian Spring, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/26/2007
Aircraft: Cessna 310R, registration: N310DM
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Arriving in the area of the destination airport, the weather was reported as, 10 statute miles of visibility; overcast clouds at 300 feet; and a temperature and dew point of 56 degrees Fahrenheit. The pilot requested and was subsequently cleared for the localizer approach. About 11 miles from the runway, the pilot failed to intercept the final approach course, and air traffic control provided additional radar vectors to assist him in doing so. About 6 miles prior to the runway threshold, the airplane intercepted the final approach course and began a descent. Twenty seconds later, the airplane made a right turn and began tracking parallel, about 1/2-mile west, of the final approach course. The descent continued to 600 feet, about 5 miles prior to the runway threshold, where the pilot executed a missed approach, and requested to "...go and try another one." On the second approach, about 6 miles prior to the runway threshold, the pilot intercepted the final approach course and began a descent. The airplane continued to track the final approach course, and about 7 miles prior to the runway threshold, the airplane's last radar return was recorded at 700 feet. The airplane came to rest on residential property about 6.5 miles from the runway threshold. A post crash fire consumed the main wreckage. The elevation of at the accident site was 717 feet. Review of the published instrument approach procedure revealed that the final approach fix (FAF) was located 5 miles from the runway threshold. The minimum crossing altitude at the FAF was 1,800 feet. The minimums for the approach were 1 statute mile of visibility, and a minimum descent altitude of 720 feet.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's failure to follow the published instrument approach procedure, which resulted in an in-flight collision with terrain. A factor related to the accident was the low cloud ceiling.

Full narrative available

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